Early Childhood » Pre K First 30 Days Activities Packet Remote Learning Lessons Phase 1 Remote Learning

Pre K First 30 Days Activities Packet Remote Learning Lessons Phase 1 Remote Learning

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Pre K First 30 Days Activities Packet

Remote Learning Lessons

September 2020

 

ecdh

 

September 2020

 

Welcome to Jersey City Public Schools Preschool Program! We are very excited to start this school year, even if it is through remote learning. The curriculum that Jersey City Public School uses is the state approved High Scope Curriculum. We urge you to visit HighScope: High-Quality Early Childhood Education and COR 360 by HighScope to get a full understanding of our active learning philosophy. We also highly recommend Family Guide to COR@Home. This is a fantastic tool to share information, photos, and videos with your child’s teacher. More information is available from the New Jersey Department of Education at  Curriculum & Assessment.

 

Included in this Preschool First 30 Days Remote Learning Packet are many educational and fun activities that will enhance your child’s growth and development in the following areas:

 

1- Morning Message: (Morning message is a time when a child learns more about the planned day’s activities).

2- Language Arts

3- Math

4- Social-Emotional

5- Gross Motor

 

Embedded throughout the document, are links to read-aloud books, music, and videos, as well as visuals designed specifically for each lesson. As parents, you have the freedom to pick and choose the lessons that are most appropriate for your child. Within each lesson are the labels

Older Students or Younger Students. You know your child best! Follow their lead when it's time to take a break! These activities are designed with flexibility in mind.

 

Many families have found success in creating a workspace for their child as well as using a daily routine picture schedule. These tools assist preschool students with organization and regulation skills. Another tool used throughout the document is a Letter Link. Your child’s teacher will provide you with a letter link to print or copy. Letter links are used in our classrooms to label children's artwork and belongings; to identify children in classroom signs, lists, and messages; and to create fun and engaging classroom literacy activities. When schools reopen, familiarity with daily routine picture schedule and letter links will help the transition to a classroom setting. 

 

Always know, the Jersey City Early Childhood Department is your partner during this difficult time.

 

We look forward to a wonderful school year!

 

 

 

echd

 

Andrea Dornbos

Brooke Noonan

Cynthia Thompson

Eileen Millan

Hala Aboulhosn

Kaitlyn Delehanty

Karen Colon

Lidia Delos Santos

Nina Ores

Razel Ariz

Cecilia Huamani

Wissam Karkout

 

Early Childhood Supervisors

Mariana Bejerano

Courtney Campbell

Michelle Thomas

 

Early Childhood Department Director

Dr. Ruth Cummings-Hypolite

Preschool Plans: Day 1

9/10/20

 

 

Thursday Thoughts

  1. 1 dotWelcome to school!school
  2. 2 dotsMy name is (insert names of teachers & their letter links)
  3. 3 dots“All About Me” –teacher can introduce each child using their letter links   harony                 
  4. 4 dots We will draw our self-portrait  self portrait   

 

Language Arts

 

 child “All About Me” child

 

ELA.SL.PK.4: Begin to describe familiar people, places, things, and events and sometimes with detail Materials: writing tools (crayons, pencils, markers) and paper

book    book 2

Beginning: View read aloud  Be Who You Are by Todd Parr and/or view read aloud  Big Hair Don't Care by Crystal Swain-Bates

Middle: Talk to your child about their different attributes e.g. the color of their hair, their eyes and skin, nose size etc. Have them draw their self-portrait.

 

          Vocabulary for Younger Students: head, eyes, nose, mouth, ears, mouth

          Older Students : add other features such as chin, cheeks, eyebrows, lips

 

End: Talk about their self-portrait and incorporate vocabulary words to describe themselves. Ask them what their favorite part of their face/body is. Comment on their picture and the choices they made in drawing their picture e.g. I see you made your hair very curly, Your skin color is light brown, Your eyes are green etc.
 
 

Math

 

hands“Count Me In! “ hands

 

Math 4.1.4a: Accurately count quantities of objects up to 10, using one-to-one correspondence, and accurately count as many as 5 objects in a scattered configuration

Materials: Writing tools (crayons, pencil, markers) and paper

Beginning: Watch  Body Parts Song for Kids, This Is ME!

Middle: On a piece of paper, write down the names of different body parts-

 

Younger Students: Keep it simple- head, eyes, nose, hands, feet, fingers, toes. Your child can draw each of the above items, and then count. Assist your child to write the number down next to the word or picture.

Older Students: Body parts can include: head, eyes, nose, hands, feet, fingers, toes, knees, chin, shoulders, eyebrows etc. Your child can count each item, then write the number next to the item. Some may make tally marks such as circles or short lines to help keep count.

 

End: Compare and contrast the different quantities e.g. which parts of your body came in pairs (or two’s?), which parts of your body had the most parts?
 

Social/Emotional

                              face“Feeling Faces” face              

Social/Emotional Development 0.3.1: Recognize and describe a wide range of feelings, including sadness, anger, fear, and happiness Materials: Emojis found on your phone, emotions chart below, hand drawn faces that show basic emotions such as happy, sad, angry, surprised, worried, scared

Beginning: Show your child each emotion picture and encourage them to label it. If they do not know, give them the name for it. .

Middle: Ask your child to express the different emotions that you have discussed. You can take pictures of your child making these “Feeling Faces” or you can have your child make  a “Feeling Faces” poster that she/he can refer to for future reference.

 

 Younger Students: basic emotions-sad, happy, scared, angry

 Older Students: Add emotions such as worried, confused, excited, frustrated etc

 

End: Discuss with your child how they are  feeling today. Ask them how they feel about going to school for the first time. If your child is returning to school discuss returning to school, seeing their new friends, and new teachers.

 

Gross Motor

prek girl“If You’re Happy and You Know It” prek girl

Health, Safety & Physical Ed 2.4.1: Develop and refine gross motor skills

Beginning:Sing and move to  If You're Happy and You Know It

Middle:After you sing along with Elmo, you can substitute other movements such as “If You’re Happy and You Know It jump up and down; If You’re Happy and You Know It spin around, etc.

End: Encourage your child to make up other movements.

 

 

Preschool Plans: Day 2

9/11/20

 

Friday Facts

 

  1. 1 square Today we will talk about family family  
  2.  2 squares  How do you feel today?  faces
  3. 3 squaresLetter Link game (teacher can pull out a letter link out of a bag and see if the children can identify their letter links)  jumping
  4. 4 squares We will dance and move
 
 

Language Arts

 
family 1“My Family”  family 1    

ELA.SL.PK.3 &4: Ask and answer questions to seek help, get information, or follow directions; Begin to describe familiar people, places, things, and events and sometimes with detail

Materials: writing tools (crayons, pencils, markers), blank book (you can pre-staple paper together with 6 pages or more)

Beginning: Read The Family Book  by Todd Parr    book 4

Middle: Discuss with your child that you will make a Family Book. Together with your child make a list of family members' names that should be included in the book. Write down each name on a separate page. Encourage your child to draw their picture and say something about each person. Write what your child says about each person.

End: Engage your child in a discussion about other unique characteristics of your family, e.g. your native country, clothing worn in your country, your home language, and other members of your family that might be residing in another country. Reread the book you created together.
 

Math

 

numbers“Family Count”numbers

 

Math 4.1.4a: & Math 4.2.2: Accurately count quantities of objects up to 10, using one-to-one correspondence, and accurately count as many as 5 objects in a scattered configuration; Begin to represent simple word problem data in pictures and drawings

Materials: Graph/grid see sample below

Beginning: Refer to the Family Book made in the Language Arts portion of today’s lesson. Have your child name the members of your family/household. Explain to your child how some members are children, and some are adults or grownups. For the 4 yr olds, you can explain to them who the “teenagers” would be in your family.

Middle: Show your child the sample graph, and tell them that you will be doing a family count. Your child can color in one box to represent each member of the family. Your child can also write the totals if able to do so.

End: Compare and contrast the quantities with your child. You can ask “how many children do we have altogether? How many adults? Which group had the most? Which group had the least?”

 

Younger Students: You can keep the graph simple by just counting the number of children and adults in your home.

Older Students: Your list can be longer and more varied depending on the ability and attention span of your child.

 

Sample graph:

7

 

 

 

6

 

 

 

5

 

 

 

4

 

 

 

3

 

 

 

2

 

 

 

1`

 

 

 

 

children (0-12yrs old)

teens (13-19yrs old)

adults (20 yrs old +)

 

 

 

Social/Emotional

smiley“Emotions Hokey-Pokey”smiley

Social/Emotional Development 0.3.1: Recognize and describe a wide range of feelings, including sadness, anger, fear, and happiness

Beginning: Have your child sing-along to this video:  Emotion Hokey-Pokey              

Middle:  Talk about the emotions in this song: happy, sad, angry, scared, surprised and silly. Have your child make these faces.

End: After the video is done, ask your child what other emotions they can name e.g. worried, confused, and ask them to make the correlating face and do the song again, but this time with their emotion of choice.

 

Additional resources for parents who might have children who are curious, worried or concerned  about the pandemic:      covid

View read aloud:Why We Stay Home: Suzie Learns about the Coronavirus by Harris, Scott and Rodis  

                           How to Defeat the Icky, Filthy, Creepy, Slimy Corona Monster

                           Covid-19 Germ Experiment for Kids
 

 

Gross Motor

“Let’s Move!”

dance

Health, Safety, and Physical Education 2.4.1: Develop and refine gross motor skills

Beginning: Have your child dance/move to one of the videos below:

Younger Students:  Freeze Dance

 Older Students: Do the Bear Walk

Middle: If doing the “Freeze Dance,” discuss with your child that when you “freeze”, you are not moving and pretending to be a frozen statue (Demonstrate this for your child). As they do this dance, have your child make different “frozen statues” for each time the song stops and they freeze. If doing “Do the Bear Walk,” have your child watch and copy the different movements in the video such as bear walk, skip around, do the bridge, gallop like a horse, do the plank etc.

End: Have your child choose one of their favorite poses or movements to show you.
 
 

Preschool Plans: Day 3

9/14/20

Monday Message

 

  1.  1 triangleWe will learn how to walk in a straight line (teacher can draw a straight line).
  2.  2 triangleHow tall am I?  tall
  3.  3 trianglesLet’s create “house rules"   house
  4. 4 trianglesWe will talk about what to do when we feel angry. angry face
 

notes “Creating House Rules” notes

 

ELA.SL.PK.1:Participate in conversations and interactions with peers and adults individually and in small and large groups

Materials: writing tools, paper

 In the beginning of the school year, teachers and students establish rules for their classroom. The daily routine is posted and used as reference to help children with transitions throughout their day. A simple classroom chart is posted to remind children of appropriate classroom behavior. Some of these rules such as “Keep hands and feet to yourselves,” “Clean up or put away materials,””We walk in the classroom,’ are also rules that can be applied at home.

 

 

 

 

 

Language Arts

 

Beginning; View the read aloud: David Goes to School by David Shannon  book      

Middle:

Younger Students: Have your child talk about the illustrations in the book. Ask your child as you discuss each page “What did David do in this picture that he wasn’t supposed to do?”

Older Students: As you discuss the book, introduce new vocabulary such as the word ‘tardy.” Ask open ended questions such as “Why do you think rules are important? What would happen if there were no rules? “

End: Together with your child, discuss and agree on at least 4 “house rules.” For example can include:

  1. Put away toys   2.  Use a quiet voice inside the house   3.  Be respectful  4.  Say please and thank you
Write these rules on a chart and post somewhere in your house, at your child’s eye level, to help reinforce these rules when needed.
 
 

Math

 

“How Tall Am I ?”

   height 

 

Math 4.3.1: Sort, order, pattern, and classify objects by non-measurable and measurable attributes (e.g length, capacity, height).

Materials: any collection of materials that can be used to measure the length/height of your child e.g shoes, large blocks, magazines/books, shoe boxes, etc.

Beginning: Younger Students: Read Jack and the Bean Stalk 

Older Students: Read Along With  Little Princess/I Want to be Tall  

Middle: Younger Students:: Discuss the story with your child. Talk about the beanstalk and how tall it grew.

Older Students: Discuss why the little princess wanted to be taller, and the lengths she goes through to achieve a taller height.

Discuss with your child that he/she will be getting taller as they get older. Say, I wonder how tall you are right now? Let’s measure!  Have your child lay on the floor and use your collection of materials e.g shoes to place beside them, from head to toe. When you are done, have your child count how many “shoes” tall they are.

End: Have your child write down the number of objects counted to measure their height. If possible, you can tell your child that you would like him/her to measure your height. Lay down on the floor and have your child place the objects to measure your height. Ask your child, who is taller? How many more ____ were needed to add to my height?
 

Social/Emotional

 

book“Sometimes I’m Bombaloo”book

 

Social/Emotional Development 0.3.3: Channel impulses and negative feelings, such as anger

Materials: Stuffed animal, puppet or doll and/or paper plate and crayons

Beginning: View read aloud Sometimes I'm Bombaloo  by Rachel Vail or If You're Angry and You Know It by Cecily Kaiser 

Middle:  Younger Students:: Ask your child to make a “Bombaloo” or angry face. Ask them to pretend that their stuffed animal or doll is            angry too.  Ask them what things would make them angry. Write down what your child says.

Older Students: Invite your child to create an angry face mask causing a paper plate and crayons. Encourage them to describe what things make them angry

End: Review the “How to Calm Down “ chart with your child. Have them describe other ways in which they can calm their emotions.

 

calm postert

 

 

 

Gross Motor

 

“Walk the Line”

 

    kids

 

Health, Safety, and Physical Education 2.4.3: Use objects and props to develop spatial and coordination skills

Materials: String or masking tape(approximately 3ft in length) that you can tape or lay out on the floor

Beginning: Discuss with your child that when he/she returns to school, they will be expected to walk in a straight line behind the teacher. Show them the straight line on the floor.

Middle: Have your child pretend that they are on a balance beam, and challenge them to walk on the line, one foot in front of the other, without stumbling. Suggest that they put their arms out like an airplane to help them keep their balance.

End: Encourage your child to use their imagination and pretend that the line is something other than string or tape. Examples would be a bridge with water underneath or a rocky trail you have to cross. Are you walking any different? If so, how?

 

Preschool Plans: Day 4

9/15/20

 

Tuesday Talk

 

  1. green dotI can count. Let’s count the green. green diot
  2. 2 dots Why do we need a harmony 
  3. 3 starsDid you dress yourself today?sweater
  4. dots 4  star Chicka Chicka Boom Boom   
         book
 
 
 

harmonyWhy Do We Need a Letter Linkharmony

 

 

Language Arts

W.PK.1: Use a combination of drawings, dictation, scribble, writing, letter strings, or invented spelling to share 
 Information:

Materials: Letter Link, a blank card, and markers.

Beginning: Tell a story "once upon a time there was a Ladybug whose name was Lili who lived in the woods. One day, Lili the ladybug forgot her name and wanted something to make her remember her name. Lili's sister came up with an idea and drew a picture of a lollipop since it shared the same first letter as Lili's first letter of her name.

“Guess what? You got a picture of something that shares the first same letter as your first name's first letter and it is called a letter link."

Name letter-linked symbol, while emphasizing the sound of the initial letter in the symbol. Point out letters on the child's letter-linked symbol (e.g., this is your moon symbol and that is your letter M . M is the first letter in  Madison. Madison and moon both start with the letter M and the /m/ sound.) point to a letter and make its sound.

Middle: give the letter-link and provide some time to your child to observe his/ her letter-link. After he/she has had the opportunity to explore his/her letter-linked card, introduce a blank card and markers and suggest that he/she might like to make his/her own cards.

End: Ask the child to place his/her letter-linked card in a basket to review later on.
 
 

 

Math

numbers    “Letter Link Count”     letters

 

4.1.4a Accurately count quantities of objects up to 10, using one-to-one correspondence, and accurately count as many as 5 objects in a scattered configuration

Materials: Letter- link and number card from 1-10., for older children first and last name written on a paper and number cards.

Beginning: Discuss with your child that his/ her name includes many different letters. Say to your child, “I’m wondering how many letters your name has”?

Middle: Give your child his/ her letter link. Encourage them to count the letters in their name, pointing to each letter as they count.

Older Students: Give your child his/her first and last name written out on a piece of paper. Then ask him/her to count all the letters while pointing at each of them.

End: Ask your child to help you to put materials away. 
 
 

Social/Emotional

                       

“Give Me Responsibilities”

jacket

 

0.2.2 Demonstrate self-help skills (e.g., clean up, pour juice, use soap when washing hands, put away belongings).

Materials: Jacket with a zipper.   

Beginning: Younger Children: Discuss with your child that today he/ she will have responsibility or a job to do. Say,” I’m wondering if you are able to put on your jacket by yourself.”

Older Children:  Say,” I’m wondering if you can put on your jacket and zip up and down the zipper?

Middle: Younger Students: Give your child the jacket and provide some time to try to put on his/ her jacket. Offer assistance to your child if needed.

Older Students: Give your child a jacket and provide some time to try for them to practice zippering the jacket.. Offer assistance to your child if needed.

End: When your child is finished acknowledge their work and achievement. Ask your child how it feels to be able to finish the task successfully. Encourage  your child to point at the emotion board and talk about his/ her feelings.  

 

smiles

 

 

 

Gross Motor 

Jump, Run, and Shout!”

girls

 

Health, Safety, and Physical Education 2.4.1

Materials: Small space and large cards showing the capital letters “ X.” “Y,” and “Z” (one letter  per card) and any kind of children’s music.    Jump, Run and Shout! | Action song for kids | The Singing Walrus

Beginning: Encourage your child to look at the letters ”X,” “Y,” and “Z. Say, ”These are the last three letters of the alphabets, and they’re all made up of straight lines! When I hold up one of these three letters, try to make its shape with your body. You can make the letter shape lying down, sitting, kneeling, standing, or up in the air.”  Show the different cards several times in a random order.

Middle: Play music. Encourage your child to dance any way they wish. After a minute or so stop the music and hold up one of the letters. Encourage your child to” freeze” their body and try to create the shape of the letter.

End: Give your child warning that the game will soon end. An example would be, “One more letter”. Stop playing the music and encourage your child to help you put the letter cards away. Keep in mind, whether or not your child accomplishes the exact letter shape, is not important. It is the child’s attempts to make the shape with her/ his body that is the valuable learning experience. Health, Safety, and Physical Education 2.4.1

Materials: Small space and large cards showing the capital letters “ X.” “Y,” and “Z” (one letter  per card) and any kind of children’s music.    Jump, Run and Shout! | Action song for kids | The Singing Walrus

Beginning: Encourage your child to look at the letters ”X,” “Y,” and “Z. Say, ”These are the last three letters of the alphabets, and they’re all made up of straight lines! When I hold up one of these three letters, try to make its shape with your body. You can make the letter shape lying down, sitting, kneeling, standing, or up in the air.”  Show the different cards several times in a random order.

Middle: Play music. Encourage your child to dance any way they wish. After a minute or so stop the music and hold up one of the letters. Encourage your child to” freeze” their body and try to create the shape of the letter.

End: Give your child warning that the game will soon end. An example would be, “One more letter”. Stop playing the music and encourage your child to help you put the letter cards away. Keep in mind, whether or not your child accomplishes the exact letter shape, is not important. It is the child’s attempts to make the shape with her/ his body that is the valuable learning experience.

 

Preschool Plans: Day 5

9/16/20

Wednesday Wonderful

 
  1. triangleWe will make a Family member’s harmony
  2. triangleAstonishing Animal ABC Book Read Aloud For Children
  3. triangleDid you brush your teeth by yourself?  little girl
  4. triangleWe will sing and dance with and on letters brushing teeth
 

Language Arts

“Everyone Can Have a Letter Link”

 early chilldhood

 

W.PK.1: Use a combination of drawings, dictation, scribble, writing, letter strings, or invented spelling to share  information

Materials:Child’s letter link,  paper, markers, scissor.

Beginning: Discuss with your child that you will make a letter link just like theirs for another family member.  Ask your child for the names of several family members.

Middle: Review the list of family members' names with your child. Point to the first letter of each of their names. Encourage your child to think of an animal or object that starts with the same letter as a family member's name. Examples can include Amanda Apple, Caiden Candle, Benjamin Button. Help your child create the letter links.

End: Inform your child that these two letter links will be used for another activity. Give him/ her an option on where he/ she would like to store them.

 

Math

 

math comparison“ Letter Link Count & Comparison”early childhood

 

4.1.6 Compare groups of up to 5 objects (e.g., beginning to use terms such as “more,” “less,” “same”).

Materials: number cards from 1-10, letter- links from the previous activity, paper, something to write with

Beginning: Review the letter links created in the previous lesson. Remind your child every letter link has different letters.

Middle: Work with your child as you observe the two letter- links. 

Younger Students: Encourage your child to count the number letters of each  letter- link.  Write that number for your child. Discuss with your child which letterlink has more letters and which letter link has fewer letters.

Older Students: Together with your child explore the letters that  are the same and the letters that are different in the letter links. Encourage your child to write the letters that are the same on one side of a piece of paper and the letters that are different on the opposite side of the piece of paper. Count both sides. Which has more? Which has less?

End: Give your child warning the activity is coming to an end and encourage your child to put materials away.

 

 

Social/Emotional

“Clean Teeth are Healthy Teeth”

brushing teeth

 

0.3.1: Recognize and describe a wide range of feelings, including sadness, anger, fear, and happiness

Health, Safety, and Physical Education: 2.1: Develop self help and personal hygiene skills

Materials: Clean Teeth Are Healthy Teeth | Short Moral Stories For Kids | English and emotions chart

Beginning: Watch the video link above.

Middle: Discuss with your child how Royfelt when his friends let him know his breath did not smell good? How did Roy feel when his mouth was in pain because of cavities? Ask them to describe Roy’s feelings with the help of the attached emotions chart

End: Have your child practice brushing their own teeth.

 

smiley

 

 

Gross Motor

danceDancing with Letters”  abc

 

1.1.8 Begin to demonstrate appropriate audience skills during creative movement and dance performances.

Animal In Action

Materials: Letter cards,  Animals In Action | Brain & Body Builders | Exercise & Fitness for Kids | Jack Hartmann

Beginning:  Review and name letters on letter cards. Place letter cards on the floor. Discuss with your child the rules of this game. The rules are as follows: When the songs start, dance and move your body the way you choose on any letter of choice. When the

music stops,freeze or stop moving on that letter card. 

Middle: Sing and dance with your child when the music is on. When the music is paused, freeze on one letter to identify it, and hold it up. Help your child identify the letters. Repeat the game several times.

End: Collect the letter cards and place them on it’s designated place to be saved.

 

 

Preschool Plans: Day 6

9/17/20

 

day

 

 

Language Arts

“What’s Missing ?”

question mark

 

W.PK.1: Use a combination of drawings, dictation, scribble, writing, letter strings, or invented spelling to share information

Materials: letter- link and a piece of blank  paper, alphabet chart

Beginning: Read Alphabet Adventure.

 

chart

 

Middle:Show your child their letter- link. Identify each letter in their name and the picture on the letter link. If your child is ready, have them repeat the  sound each letter  makes. Use a small piece of blank paper and cover one letter at a time. Ask your child what letter is covered? Cover the picture on the letter link. Ask your child what is missing. Repeat the game many times until you have mentioned all the missing letters.

Older Children: To make the game a bit more challenging, encourage your child to identify the letters on an alphabet chart. Cover one letter then two letters and ask the child if he/ she can recognize the covered or the missing letters on the alphabet chart.

End: Encourage your child to say or write at least one letter in their name.

Counting Bears | Counting numbers from 1 to 6

 

 

Math

Bear Counts

4.1.4a: Accurately count quantities of objects up to 10, using one-to-one correspondence, and accurately count as many as 5 objects in a scattered configuration

Materials: Paper, Crayons

Beginning: Read Bear Counts / READ ALOUD

Middle: Re-read the story Bear Counts. Have your child identify the following objects in the story and count each one. Which objects had the most? Which objects had the least? Discuss the names of each object. Are some objects new to your child?

 

counts

 

 

 

Social/Emotional

early childhood“The Way I Feel”early childhood

 

0.3.1: Recognize and describe a wide range of feelings, including sadness, anger, fear, and happiness

Materials: A paper, markers, or crayons, emotions chart

Beginning: Read The Way I Feel

Middle: Review all of the emotion names mentioned in the book. If needed show your child the emotions chart. Discuss with your child their favorite part of the book. Work with your child to draw their favorite emotion. 

End: Discuss with your child a time when you both experienced that emotion.

 

early childhood

 

Gross Motor

alphabet“Alphabet Hunt”early childhood

 

1.1.3 Participate in simple sequences of movements.

Materials: Letters of alphabet written on individual pieces of paper, movement cards

Beginning: Distribute letters on a floor in an open space. Review the following movement cards with your child.

 

Walk walkHophop RunrunJumpjump

 

 

 

Crab Walk crab walkCrawl crawlTwirltwirl

 

Middle: Hold up a movement card and encourage your child to perform that movement as they make their way to a letter card. Once at the letter card , help your child to name the letter. Repeat until all movements have been completed.

End: Discuss with your child which movements they found easy and which movements they found most difficult.

 

Preschool Plans: Day 7

9/18/20

 

Friday Fun

 

  1. oneWe will read a book about feelings. Link to read aloud video: Lots of Feelings
  2. twoWhat feelings do we know?   faces
  3. 3We will learn a new song. logo      
  4. 4We will make an emotion face .logo

Feelings  - Sung to the tune of Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star

I have feelings (point to self)

So do you (point to children)

Let's all sing about a few.

I am happy (smile).

I am sad (frown).

I get scared. (Wrap arms around self and make a scared face).

I get mad (make a fist and shake it or stomp feet).

I am proud of being me (hands on hips, shoulders straight, smile)

That's a feeling too, you see.

I have feelings (point to self)

You do, too (Point to children)

We just sang about a few

 

 

Language Arts

Sometimes I Feel..”.

book

 

ELA. SL.PK.4: Describe familiar people, places, things,and events and sometimes with details.  Social-Emotional Development 0.3.1: Identify and express feelings.

Materials: Family photos, Magazine pictures, Mirror

Beginning: Encourage your child to pick family photos and/or pictures from magazines, one by one, and describe what you see. After sharing what they see, ask them - how do you think the person(s) in the photo is feeling?  If your child needs support to answer you can begin by having them look at the person’s face showing emotions: the mouth, cheeks, nose, eyes, forehead, eyebrows, etc.

For example, look at your sister in this photo, it looks like she was crying, her lips are curled down and she has tears on her cheeks. Using photos/pictures is a way to help your child understand, respond to, and describe emotions. Begin by focusing on parts of the face that relate to showing emotions: the mouth, cheeks, nose, eyes, forehead, eyebrows, etc.

Middle: Use a hand-held mirror or a mirror your child can use to see their faces. Have them practice happy, sad, angry faces.  Name the emotion as they move parts of their faces - mouth, eyebrows, forehead, etc. and describe what you see, “You moved your lips/mouth to make a smile. It looks like you are making a happy face”. Your mouth and your eyes are wide open. It looks like you are surprised”.

End: Consider turn-taking with one another making emotion faces guess what emotions you are showing.

                                                   

 

 

Math

 

 “ Sort the Feelings” 

face

4.3.1  Conceptualize measurable attributes of objects. Math 4.1: Children begin to demonstrate an understanding of number and counting. Social-Emotional Development 0.3.1: Identify and express feelings.

Materials: Pictures of different feeling faces below *Optional - Pictures you have at home of family members or magazines

Beginning: Below are pictures of people expressing different emotions. Encourage your child to look at each picture and identify the feelings.

Middle: Encourage your child to sort all the pictures by emotion. All happy faces together, all sad faces together, etc.  After pictures have been sorted, count how many are in each group. Write that number on a piece of paper and show your child the number. .Some children may not be able to identify or recognize feelings initially and may want to sort using different attributes: boy/girl, hair color, eye color, etc.. If your child sorts by attributes other than feelings, point to one picture one and discuss it: "You're right! That girl does have blue eyes! Hmmm, look at her face. How do you think she feels?"..if no response say, "Happy? Sad?" This is a developing skill that may need support from you.

 

children

End: As your child identifies the emotion in each picture have your child place all pictures on a graph* (all “happy” faces in one column, all “sad” faces in the next column, etc). Then compare and contrast. Ask: 1.“How many “_____” faces?; 2. Which feeling has the most? 3. Which feeling had the least?

   *Sample graph:

                        How many faces do we see?   

chart

                 

Social/Emotional

The Many Faces I See

logo

 

0.3..1 Identify and express feelings.

Health, Safety, and Physical Education: 2.4.2: Develop competence and confidence in activities that require fine motor skills

Materials:Paper/Construction paper/Paper Plates, PlayDoh, Pencil/Marker/Crayons

Beginning:  Review the emotions photographs from today’s math sort lesson.  

Middle: Encourage your child to make their own feeling face” with play-dough. Use the templates below and encourage your child to make facial features with play-dough on each of the 4 templates. If play dough is not available, your child can use plain paper or even paper plates and crayons to draw “feeling faces”..

End:  In addition to identifying the feeling you may want to consider asking: 1. Why is he/she feeling ____?;

  1. What makes you feel ______?

Use the link below for an activity demonstration: Teaching Feelings/Today I Feel Playdough Mats

 

feelings

 

 

Gross Motor

Simply Lid Frisbee Toss

student 

                                                                                 

Health, Safety, and Physical Education: 2.4.3:Develop competence and confidence in activities that require fine & gross motor skills

Materials: Circular Plastic Container Lids or Paper plates, Tape

Beginning: Discuss with your child the shape of the lid (circle) and that you will pretend it is a frisbee. Put three pieces of tape on the floor one foot apart from each other. Explain to your child they will toss the “frisbee” to the lines of tape.

Middle: Decide upon a starting point to stand behind, choose who gets to toss first, and then toss the lids toward the taped lines.

Younger Students: Encourage your child to toss the lids so the land on or close to each line.

Older Students: Give your child points for each lid that lands on a line. Give 1 point for the first line. Give 2 points for the second line and 3 points for the last line. Help your child to “add up” all of their points.

End: After a few sequences led by the adult,  you can switch leaders and have the child take the lead creating sequences that the adult now has to copy. If you and your child truly enjoy this game you can change it up further by trying this same game now using your feet. Moving them slow, fast, hop, jump, stomp, etc.

 

Preschool Plans: Day 8

9-19-20

Marvelous Monday

 

 

  1. feelingsFeelings check: How are we feeling today? Place letter links on/under feeling they say.
  2. hapySing: If You're Happy and You Know It happy
  3. masksWe will make monster masks
 

Language Arts

“Glad Monster Sad Monster Emotion Mask”

masks

                                                                                  

ELA.RL.PK.10: Actively participate in read aloud experiences using age appropriate literature in individual, small and large groups.  Visual & Performing Arts 1.4.2: Express themselves through and develop an appreciation of the visual arts.

 

Materials: Construction Paper, Pencil/Crayons/Markers, Buttons/beads/ribbon, Scissors, Magazines (optional).

 Beginning: Remind your child about yesterday’s discussion about feelings. Share that you have another fun book to share about different emotions. Read or listen to the read aloud of the Glad Monster, Sad Monster. (  Enlace para leer en voz alta en Espanol: Monstruo Triste, Monstruo Feliz)

Middle: After you read or listen to the read aloud (link above), encourage your  child to create their own Glad Monster Sad Monster Mask. Your child can pick the monster emotion they want to make with materials you have at home (buttons, ribbons, beads, paper plates, etc.).  Your child can also choose to draw their emotion mask on plain/construction paper using pencil, crayons, or markers instead.

End: Ask your child to share with you what feeling monster they made.  Adults can then ask - Why do you think  the monster is feeling that way?  What makes you feel that way?  Write down the words they say.  For example, your child might pick the pink monster (in the book this monster represents “love”, they draw their “loving” monster mask. You ask what makes you feel “loved” -they say “hugs from mom”, “baking with grandma”, “reading a book with daddy”, etc.) 
 

 

Math

“Feeling Monster Match Game”

monster match

 

4.3.1: Conceptualize measurable attributes of objects. Social-Emotional Development 0.5.4: Exhibit prosocial behaviors

Materials: Feeling Monster Cards (provided below)

Beginning: Invite your child to play a memory card game. Show your child each card by pointing to it and indicating what emotion the card represents. Show your child the two matches and say ,”happy monster with happy monster, love monster with love monster. These two cards are the same”.

Middle:  As you lay out the cards, also share with your child that each of you will take turns picking two cards at a time.  You may want to start the game to model what to do and say, “I will start the game, it’s MY TURN (point to yourself as you say it)” After you pick your two cards, either a match or not, you then say, “It's now YOUR TURN” (point to your child). 

 

turns

 

Younger Students: You may want to lay the cards out face up and start with two sets of pairs.   Add another set of cards each round as your child is better able to match the same cards together.

Older Students: To make the game a bit more challenging, start by  turning the monster cards over (face down) in front of your child before choosing cards. Memory is now part of the game.

End: As you take turns making matches, keep those you find correctly. Periodically continue with saying, “Your turn”, “My turn” to help your little one with the concept of taking-turns between players.  When all the cards are matched, count the number of pairs each of you made. You may then ask: Who has more cards?  How many emotions did you find?

 

emotions

 

 

Social/Emotional

“Pass the Ice Cream”

ice cream

 

0.5.5: Demonstrate understanding the concept of sharing by attempting to share. Health, Safety, and Physical Education: 2.4.3:Develop competence and confidence in activities that require fine motor skills

Materials: Paper, Tape, Plastic Balls (ball pit size ball or anything lightweight will work, as long as it will fit inside your paper cones.)

Before the lesson, take two sheets of  paper and roll it into a cone shape. Make sure that the opening is wide enough for a ball to fit inside. Secure the edges of the paper with clear tape. This will be the outside of your cone.

 

Beginning: Then talk with your child about the importance of friendship and how it feels good to share with our friends/family members.

Read   Should I Share My Ice Cream?book

Middle: Encourage your child to take a paper cone so they can “share their ice cream”.  (If you have other little ones this would be a good time to have them join in for this activity just make sure everyone has a cone). Put a ball inside one of the cones to serve as the "ice cream." Then encourage each child to take a turn sharing their ice cream with their friend by passing it from one cone to another.

 

ice cream

End: Encourage them to say "Would you like to share my ice cream?" as they each take a turn - it's a great opportunity to practice politeness by saying "please" and "thank you" as well as friendship skills.  This is harder than it looks when you're little! But it is so much fun!

 

“Monster Dance”

 

Visual & Performing Arts 1.1.1: Express themselves through  and develop an appreciation of creative movement and dance. Health, Safety, and Physical Education 2.4: Develop competence and confidence in activities that require gross motor skills.

 

Materials: Paper, Pencil, Music Link to “Monster Music” at Monster Mash Music

Beginning:  Create names for 2 or 3 different monsters from the Glad Monster Sad Monster book using feeling words (Hank the Happy Monster, Allie the Angry Monster , Wendy the Worried Monster, Sam the Silly Monster, etc.). Write these on paper so you and your child can see them. 

Middle: Discuss with your child  how each monster you named might move. For example, Hank the Happy Monster might skip around and jump for joy, while Allie the Angry Monster might move by stomping her feet! Write or draw how your child wants each monster to move. Now share that you are going to play some music and show your monsters’ dance moves. Ask your child to show you what that move looks like. Now play some music and call out a monster you named, everyone will now move like that monster (the movement your child decided above). Keep calling out, at random, all the monsters you named until the music stops!

End: Give your child a warning the activity is coming to an end. Encourage your child to perform their favorite “monster move” one more time!

 

 

 

 

Preschool Plans: Day 9

9-20-20

 

Tuesday Talks

   1. 1We will learn a new song.

The More We Get Together

The more we get together,

Together, together,

The more we get together,

The happier we'll be.

Because your friends are my friends,

And my friends are your friends.

The more we get together,

The happier we'll be!

 
     2. READ ALOUDLink for read aloud: 1-2-3 A Calmer Me We will read a book about calming our bodies.
 
     3. READINGWe will learn different breathing exercises.
     4. CHOICE We will make a choice board of ways “I can calm down."
 

 

Language Arts

Ways I Can Calm Down Choice Boar”

 

ELA.SL.PK.1:Participate in conversations and interactions with peers and adults individually.

Social Emotional Development 0.3.3: Children identify and express feelings.

 

Materials: ,  Paper, Pencils/Markers, Pictures (various provided below), Tape

Beginning: Remind your little one that during greeting time they listened to a story called 1 2 3 a calmer me.   You can view & listen to the book once again to remind your little one about these hard to deal with emotions.   1-2-3 A Calmer Me

Middle:  Discuss with your child how the  children in this book calmed their bodies. Ask your little one about other things they can do to calm their bodies when they feel those same feelings. Brainstorm with them and offer some suggestions about things that may help them calm down (some suggestions are also provided below). Decide on a few and create a list of the ways they can calm down. These will be the choices your little will choose from when they are attempting to calm down after feeling angry, disappointed, frustrated, etc. You may want to use a picture, to help serve as a visual reminder about what your child can do when they get angry, frustrated, anxious. Please see the examples provided below.

 

CHART

 

End:  Remind your child that it is okay to feel strong feelings but it is not okay to hurt themselves or others. Review the many alternative options with your child and explain that these options are ways will help them feel better and also work through the problem or situation that made them feel angry, frustrated, etc, in the first place.  Other suggestions can include:

 

STRONG

 

 

 

Math

 

Feeling Shapes Game”

SHAPES

4.4.2 Children develop spatial and geometric shapes. Social Emotional Development 0.3.3: Children identify and express feelings

Materials: Paper, Paper shapes, Bag or Container, Pencil/Markers/Crayons

Prior to Activity: Cut out different shapes and on one side draw a face showing an emotion: happy, sad, mad, scared, etc.  Place these shapes in the bag or container so the child is not able to see

Beginning:. Discuss with your child that you will play a feelings shape game.

Middle: Ask your child to pick a shape out of the bag.  Ask your child, “What shape do you see?” Wait for their response. Provide support if needed. If they are not able to identify the shape provide the label for them, i.e. - “triangle”. Then ask, “How is the triangle (shape they picked) feeling?” See if they can identify the emotion on the shape. If they are not able to name it, provide the emotion word by saying, “Happy Triangle”. Your child can continue to pick shapes out of the bag. Name the shapes and then identity how each shape is feeling.

SHAPES

End: Give your child warning the activity is coming to an end. Encourage your child to pick one more shape. This time as they pick the shape you can say, “After you pick your shape you can draw or trace the same shape on your paper”.  Your child can then identify the shape and draw the same feeling face or a different emotion if they choose. 

 

Social/Emotional

 

“ Calm Down Breathing Exercises”    

BREATHING

 

0.3.3: Children identify and express feelings

Materials: Breathing Cards (provided below)

Beginning: Review the cards below and introduce two at a time to your child. It may take several days to introduce all 8 cards.

Younger Students: Start with 1 or 2 breathing cards. 

Older Students: Introduce 2-3 breathing cards. Once your child becomes familiar with the breathing exercise you can continue to introduce others one at a time.

Middle:  After choosing the cards you will introduce, read them once out loud to your child. Then read it a second time while modeling what is described on the card as your child looks on.  Now have your child try the breathing exercise alongside you as you read the card a third time, copying you as you move. Provide the support they may need to copy your moves.

End: Give your child warning the activity is coming to an end. Encourage them to pick one last exercise to perform with you. Refer to these breathing exercises to calm their bodies when they are feeling angry, frustrated, or disappointed.

 

FEELINGS

 

“Balance with Paper”

 

Health, Safety, and Physical Education 2.4:Develop competence and confidence in activities that require gross motor skills.

Materials: Sheets of Paper, Pillow

Beginning: Discuss with your child that today you both will play games with paper on the floor. Fold the paper in half lengthwise. You may want to consider taping paper to  the floor.

Middle: Try as many of the balance activities with your child as they wish to do!

 

1.Balance Beam: Can you walk across the paper beam forwards, sideways, and backwards? How about walking across the paper beam with a heel to toe pattern?

 

2.One Foot Challenge: Fold a sheet of paper in half and set it upright on the floor like a paper tent about 6 inches in front of your right foot. Balance on the left foot. Without putting your right foot down, can you bend over and pick up the piece of paper? Now put the folded paper tent in front of your left foot. Balance on your right foot and without putting your left foot down, bend over and pick up the sheet of folded paper again.

 

 

Gross Motor

 

“Balance with Paper”

BALANCE

 

Health, Safety, and Physical Education 2.4:Develop competence and confidence in activities that require gross motor skills.

Materials: Sheets of Paper, Pillow

Beginning: Discuss with your child that today you both will play games with paper on the floor. Fold the paper in half lengthwise. You may want to consider taping paper to  the floor.

Middle: Try as many of the balance activities with your child as they wish to do!

 

1. Balance Beam: Can you walk across the paper beam forwards, sideways, and backwards? How about walking across the paper beam with a heel to toe pattern?

 

2. One Foot Challenge: Fold a sheet of paper in half and set it upright on the floor like a paper tent about 6 inches in front of your right foot. Balance on the left foot. Without putting your right foot down, can you bend over and pick up the piece of paper? Now put the folded paper tent in front of your left foot. Balance on your right foot and without putting your left foot down, bend over and pick up the sheet of folded paper again.

3. Balance Taps: Stand on a pillow and place 4 sheets of paper on the floor around the pillow. Practice squatting down without losing your balance and tapping each sheet of paper with your right hand. Stand up and then squat again touching each sheet of paper with your left hand. Try doing the same activity again but try it on one foot.

 

4. Paper Hops: Place a few sheets of paper in a line about 6 inches apart. Challenge the child to hop on one foot along the paper path without losing their balance. Increase the challenge by putting the paper sheets in a scattered format instead of a straight line. Trying hopping again on the right and then the left foot along the twisty path.

 

5. Paper Kicks: Make a few paper tents so that the paper is standing up slightly on the floor. Place a throw pillow on the floor. Stand up 5 paper tents around the pillow. Stand on the pillow and balance on your right foot. Use your left foot to knock over each one of the paper tents. Switch and balance on your right foot and kick with your left foot.

 

End: Whether you pick one, a few, or all of these balance activities to do with your child, it will definitely be fun and it will sure to improve their balance skills while at home!

 

Preschool Plans: Day 10

9/23/20

 

Wednesday Wonder

 

  1. 1Today we will talk about colors  1 PART 2
  2. What is your favorite color? 2
  3.  3
  4. 4Lets pretend to be a WONDER
 

Language Arts

 

RL.PK.2 With prompting and support retell familiar stories; RL.PK.10: participate in read aloud experiences

Materials: Scavenger Hunt Form, Crayons

Beginning: Read A Color of His Own, by Leo Lionni

Middle: Go outside for a walk in your neighborhood to look for things that would change the chameleon’s color.  Use the form below.

CHART

End: Review all the different things you saw on your walk and their color. Ask your child permission to write what each picture represents. Share with your child your favorite thing you saw on the walk and ask them to share their favorite.

 

 

Math

“Sort the Laundry”

mix

 

4.3.1 Sort, order, pattern, and classify objects by non-measurable (e.g., color, texture, type of material) and measurable attributes(e.g., length, capacity, height). )

Materials: Laundry that has been washed, but not folded

Beginning: Read the book  Mix It Up

Middle: Discuss with your child the many colors in the book. Ask your child if they would like you to sort the laundry. Have children match all the socks and identify the color. Sort all the clothes by color. Count all the things that need to be hung, then ask children to get the same amount of hangers.

End:Have children help carry the clothes to each person’s room. Once they get to their own room, they will put their own clothes away.

Cleanup:When the activity is done, your house should be cleaner than when you started!

Younger Students:Younger children will have a harder time sorting clothes.  Adjust your expectations and accept their efforts. Alternatively, give younger children simple jobs that don’t require as much precise work as sorting the socks or putting their clothes away.

 

“In My Heart”

heart

0.3.1: Recognize and describe a wide range of feelings, including sadness, anger, fear, and happiness

Materials: Paper, Crayons, Hole Punch & String(optional)

Beginning:  Read   In My Heart: A Book of Feelings

Middle: Re-read the  story. Stop on a page where the character is expressing an emotion.  Ask your child, “What do you think she is feeling?” “Look at her face, how can you tell that she is feeling _____?”  Other questions could be, “Do you remember a time when you felt ___?” “What made you feel that way?”

End: When the story ends, discuss with your child  what they thought about the book and if they have ever had similar feelings ? Use the emotions chart below to help facilitate the discussion.

feelings

Older Students: Have children draw a shape from the story to represent a feeling. Punch a hole and tie a string or ribbon on the picture  and hang the cards at the child’s level somewhere in the house.  Tell them they can refer to them whenever they need to express their feelings.

 

cheer boy“ Cheer Fun”cheer girl

 

Health, Safety, and Physical Education: 2.4.3:Develop competence and confidence in activities that require fine & gross motor skills

Materials: newspaper, tape and scissors

Prior to lesson: (A) Roll up the newspaper into a stick shape. Tape it closed at the bottom.(B) Cut the top of the stick vertically where the dotted lines are pictured. C) This will create the pom pom.You may want to wrap a piece of regular paper around the handle of the pom pom to prevent the child from getting newsprint on his/her hands.

 

cheer

 

Beginning: Discuss with your child cheerleaders can be both boys or girls. Explain how important their role is to make other people feel happy!

Middle: The children can play cheerleader. Practice the following cheerleader moves:

Wave the pom pom in the air

Make large arm circles with the pom poms

Throw it up and catch it

Throw it up, spin around and catch it before it hits the ground

Toss it to a partner

Toss it under your leg and catch it

Toss it under your leg to a partner

Jump up in the air and shake it

Jump up in the air and spread legs apart

Balance the cheerleader stick on your hand

Toss it up and catch it with one hand

Throw it up with one hand and catch it with the other

Make up a cheer for your family or class

 

End: Encourage your child to create a move. Perform the movement together.

 

 

Preschool Plans : Day 11

9/24/20

 

 Thursday Thoughts

 

  1. 1We will read a book about colors
  2. 2We will go on a color hunt in our house
  3. 3We will learn how to be friends
  4. 1We will play a kicking game
 

“I Spy Color Hunt”   

magnify 

Language Arts 

 

ELA. RL.PK.10: Actively participate in read aloud experiences using age appropriate literature in individual, small and large groups.

 

Materials: Magnifying glass or any prop that they can pretend is a magnifying glass ( a large spoon or spatula,or a small hand held mirror), crayons, paper.

 

Beginning:

Younger Students: Read vbear  Brown Bear, Brown Bear, What Do You See?

Older Students:boook Read    My Many Colored Days

Vocabulary : flap, drag, seal, groan

Have your child recall the colors and the animals they saw in the book.

Middle: Tell your child that today we  will go “color hunting” in the house.

Younger Students: Limit the color hunt to a small area of your home or one room. Have your child search with their “magnifying glass” for different colors in the house. Say, “ I spy something that is blue” . If your child has a difficult time guessing, give other clues.

Older Students:The hunt can be expanded to a larger area.

End:

Younger Students: Encourage your child to draw their favorite animal from the book.

Older Students:Review the colors your child remembers from the book. Encourage them to draw a picture using their favorite color.

 

 

 

“Egg Carton Toss”

eggs

 

4.1.2 Recognize and name one-digit written numbers up to 10 with minimal prompting

Materials: Empty egg carton, markers, and any small object such as a ping pong ball, marble, dice, small block or toy.

Beginning: Encourage your child to color the inside of each egg compartment a color of their choice. After they are done, write numbers using a marker in each of the compartments, 1-12.

Middle:

Younger Students: Have your child “toss” their small object into one of the compartments. Encourage them to identify the color and number. You can take turns with your child.

 

Older Students: If appropriate, write numbers higher than 10. Encourage your child to toss two times for each turn, and see if they can add the 2 numbers together using small counters like pennies or pom-poms.

 

End: As you transition to the next activity sing Five Brown Buns 

 

 

 

Math

 

“5 Brown Buns”

buns

(hold up 5 fingers, and as your child sings the song, you can fold down a finger at a time)

 

“5 brown buns in the bakery shop/5 brown buns with the sugar on top

Along came a boy with a penny to pay, he took one bun and he ran away

 

4 brown buns in the bakery shop/4 brown buns with the sugar on top

 

Along came a boy with a penny to pay, he took 1 bun and he ran away

 

Repeat until there are no brown buns left.
 

                         

Social/Emotional

   “Let’s Be Friends”      

 

0.4.6: Demonstrate verbal or nonverbal problem-solving skills without being aggressive

Beginning: Read The Land of Many Colors  colors

Middle:

Younger Students:Have your child try to retell the story to you. Talk about how the different colors were fighting with each other, and ask them what happened when they decided to be friends. Discuss better ways to deal with anger or frustration towards others. Refer to the chart below. Role-play different scenarios.

Older Students: Discuss with your child a time in which they have had an argument with another child or sibling.. Refer to the chart below and role-play some of the scenarios with your child. For example, have your child hold a toy and you can pretend to snatch it from them. Ask your child what they should do when this situation happens.

friends

End: You can sing this simple song about friends. Song: “Friends, Friends 123”/The Kiboomers https://youtu.be/QaITh9NEQ38

 

“Kick the Cup”

kick

 

Health, Safety & Physical Ed 2.4.1: Develop and refine gross motor skills

Materials:markers, paper cups  or empty water bottles

You can refer to this short demo video for this activity:  Kick the Cup

Beginning:

Younger Students:  Parents can prepare for this activity by labeling 5 cups or empty water bottles with either numbers, letters or shapes. Set the 5 cups in a triangle shape similar to bowling pins.

Older Students: Increase the number of cups or empty water bottles to 10. Instruct your child to point to a particular cup or bottle, and see if they can knock down their intended target.

Middle: Have your child kick a ball towards the cups and when they knock the objects down, have them identify the number, letter or shape you have written on the objects.

End: Say the names of the letters or numbers as you clean up the bottles or cups.
 
 

Preschool Plans: Day 12

9/25/20

Friday Fun
  1. 1
  2. 2We will play a card gamecard   aboutfaces
  3. 3What comes next?smiles
  4. 4questionDid you use aspoonor at? breakfast

 

 

“Colors Everywhere”

raibow

 

Language Arts

 

RLPK.10:Actively participate in read aloud experiences

RL.PK.2: With prompting and support retell familiar stories

W.PK.1: Use a combination of drawings, dictation, scribble, writing, letter strings, or invented spelling to share  information

Materials: Paper, Crayons

Younger Students

Beginning:  Read  How Do Dinosaurs Learn Their Colors? dinosaurs

Middle:Show your child the pictures below. Re-read the book and ask your child to point to the picture as it appears in the story. Label the item for your child.

 

RedredPurple purple Green green  Blueblue  Pink pink   Yellowyellow  Brown brown

 

White Chalk 

    

Orange  orange Rainbow rainbow

 

End: Ask your child to explain the story in their own words.Have them rate the story with a thumbs up or thumbs down. 

thumbs   

 

Older Students:

Beginning: Read  Green is a Chile Pepper book

Middle:

Discuss with your child the colors mentioned in the book. Let your child know they will become authors of their very own book about colors. Encourage your child to draw a picture for each color mentioned in the book.   Write what your child says about each drawing.   .

End:

Staple your child's drawings together. Ask your child to “read” the book to you.

 

 

Math

“Patterns”

patterns

 

4.3.1 Pattern objects by measurable and non-measurable attributes

Materials:

Pattern cards, Crayons or small colored objects

Younger Students:

Beginning: Show your child the pattern cards. Point to each color and say its name.

Middle:

Use one card at a time. Encourage your child to duplicate or match the pattern they see on the card using crayons or small colored items.

End:

Encourage your child to make a pattern with their crayons.

Older Students

Beginning:

Show your child the pattern cards and explain some colors are missing.beginning

 

Middle:

This set of pattern cards have some missing. Children have to figure out which color in the pattern is missing to extend the pattern.

End:

Ask your child to explain how they came up with their answer.end

 

 

Social/Emotional

“Emotion Memory”

smile

 

3.1 Recognize and describe a wide range of feelings

Materials: Game Cards

Beginning:

Show your child the emotion cards above. Ask your child about a time when they might have felt happy, sad, mad, surprised, confused, or confused.

Middle:

Younger Students:

Ask your child to point to the two cards that are the same. Ask them to pretend to make a face that represents that emotion.

Older Students:

Cut out the above cards. Place the cards on a table and show your child where each card is located. Flip the cards over. Encourage your child to find two cards that are the same.

End:

Ask your child to show you their matches. Count the pairs.

Label each card.

 

label

 

 

Gross Motor

 

“Make Your Own Map”

map

 

Health, Safety, and Physical Education:  2.4: Develop competence and confidence in activities that require gross and fine motor skills.

 

Materials: paper , markers or pens

Beginning: Discuss with your child that you will make a “map”. Draw various shapes on paper similar to the samples provided. 

 

Middle:

Call out various commands for the child to follow along the map such as: jump from square to square, walk only on the circles,hop on the squares,walk without stepping on any shapes, crawl without touching any shapes

End:

Invite your child to be the leader and tell you how to follow the map.

Older Students:

To vary the activity, write letters and numbers in the shapes and the child can jump to various letters or numbers.

 

 

Preschool Plans: Day 13

9/28/20

 

 

 

  1. treeWe will learn aboutapple.What do you know aboutapple ?
  2. 2Did you put on your ownsneaker today?
  3. treesHold up your letter linkharmony.Point to the first letter. Trace it with yourfinger.
  4. Say the name of the letterlips

“Apples”

apples

 

SL.PK.2: Ask and answer questions about text or other information red aloud

W.PK.1: Use a combination of drawings, dictation, scribble, writing, letter strings, or invented spelling to share  information

Materials: Apple Facts, Crayons, Paper

Beginning:

Read the following facts about apples to your child.

 

•Apples grow on trees.           apple tree
 •Most apples are still picked by hand.   apple tree
 
Apples can be red, green, or yellow.  colors    
 
Apples have many parts.  parts

 

Most apple blossoms or flowers are pink when they open.apple blossom

 

Middle

Have a discussion with your child about apples. What are your favorite foods made with apples?Where can we see or buy apples?

Where do apple trees grow?What do you like about apples?What don’t you like about apples?

End: Encourage your child to remember one fact about apples. Draw a picture together. Write what your child says about the picture.
 

“Way Up High in the Apple Tree”

 

Visual & Performing Arts:1.2 Express themselves through and develop an appreciation of music

Math:4.1 Begin to demonstrate an understanding of numbers and counting

Materials:

Apple Tree Poem, Apple Tree Counting Cards, Way Up High in an Apple

Beginning:

Show your child the apple tree counting cards numbered 1-5.  Point to each number after you count the number of apples on each tree. 

trees

Middle:

SIng the following poem with your child. Start with the apple tree counting card with 5 apples. The poem will gradually count down. As the numbers change in the poem hold up the corresponding card.

 

Way Up High in the Apple Tree

tree

 

Way up high in the apple tree, I saw 5 apples looking at me.

I shook the tree as hard as I could. Down came one apple and it was good!

Crunch! Crunch!

 

Way up high in the apple tree, I saw 4 apples looking at me. I shook the tree as hard as I could. Down came one apple and it was good!

Crunch! Crunch!

 

Way up high in the apple tree, I saw 3 apples looking at me. I shook the tree as hard as I could. Down came one apple and it was good!

Crunch! Crunch!

 

Way up high in the apple tree, I saw 2 apples looking at me. I shook the tree as hard as I could. Down came one apple and it was good!

Crunch! Crunch!

 

Way up high in the apple tree, I saw 1 apple looking at me. I shook the tree as hard as I could. Down came one apple and it was good!

Crunch! Crunch!

End:

Younger Students: Discuss with your child what happened to all the apples? Are there any apples left?

Older Students: Place two number cards together, ask them to count how many apples all together.
 

       “In a Photo”

photo

 

3.1 Recognize and describe a wide range of feelings

Materials: Magazines, newspaper, or family photos

Beginning:Read the story: Guess How Much I Love You   photos

Middle:

 Talk about how people show their love. Look through family photos, magazines and newspapers for pictures that show people doing things that are loving, Ask your child what they see in the pictures. Tell them what you see in the pictures.

Then discuss: How do their friends show love? How do they show their friends they love them?

End:

Share the following poem with your child:

Some families are large

(spread arms out wide)

Some families are small

(bring arms close together)

But I love my family

 (cross arms over chest)

best of all!

 

 

“Sock Ball”

sock

 

Health, Safety, and Physical Education: 2.4: Develop competence and confidence in activities that require gross and fine motor skills.

Materials: old clean, tube sock; cotton balls, tongs; yarn or string

Beginning: Fine Motor Skills: Roll the sock down all the way past the heel. Place cotton balls or small pieces of cotton fill near the sock. Hold the sock open for the child. The child can try to use the tongs to pick up the cotton balls and place inside the sock. Thechild can also try to pull the cotton balls apart and place them inside the sock. Continue to place cotton balls inside the sock until it is filled up to be about the size of a tennis ball. Unroll the sock. Tie a piece of yarn around the top of the balled area in the sock. If you do not have yarn available, tie the sock in a knot above the cotton

balls.

Middle: Gross Motor: Now you are ready to play with your sock ball. There are many games to play with it such as:

Toss it up and catch it. Toss it up, clap your hands and catch it. Toss it to a partner. Throw it under your leg and toss it to a partner. Swing it in the air and throw it - see who can throw it the farthest. Throw it at a target. Try to hit it with a bat.

End: Give your child warning the activity is coming to an end. Encourage them to perform their favorite movement.
 

Preschool Plans: Day 14

9/29/20

 

Tuesday Talk

 

  1. treeNewstar BooksbooksAboutapple
  2. 2Did you brush your own teeth today?brushing teeth
  3. 3What will you do for exercise today? exercise
 

Language Arts

 

A Trip to the Orchard”

orchard

 

RLPK.10:Actively participate in read aloud experiences

RL.PK.2: With prompting and support retell familiar stories

W.PK.1: Use a combination of drawings, dictation, scribble, writing, letter strings, or invented spelling to share  information

Materials:Paper, crayons

Beginning:

Younger Students:

 

Read :"Pat The Bunny" At The Apple Orchard            

Middle:

Tell your child you will go on an apple orchard scavenger hunt!   Re-read the book again and look for the following images in the story as you go

 

Basket basketLadderladder    Butterflybutterfly Worm  wormWhite Fence fence

Tree Stumpstump  Rolling Pinrolling pinApple Pieapplie pie

 

End

Ask your child to tell you what happened in the story in their own words. How many pictures were you able to find?

 

Have them rate the story with a thumbs up or thumbs down.

 up or down

 

Older Students:

Beginning: Read The Apple Pie Tree by Zoe Hall  book

Middle:  Discuss and define new vocabulary words in the story. Some of the words can be: “guard”, “buds”, and  “blossom”.  Ask your child to tell you how the apple tree grows apples (targets sequencing) and have him/her describe what the apple tree looks like.

apple tree 

End: Review the seasons of the year and ask your child what their favorite season is. Encourage your child to draw a picture of the apple tree in their favorite season.seasons

 

 

Beginning:

Explain to your child you need their help to make Applesauce muffins. Gather ingredients and kitchen tools necessary. Show your child the picture recipe card. Read it with them.

 Middle:

Follow the recipe and guide your child to help as much as possible.

Point to numbers in the recipe and explain their meaning to your child.

 

 

Math

“Let’s Bake Together” 

food

 

4.3.2 Begin to use appropriate vocabulary to demonstrate awareness of measurable attributes

4.1 Begin to demonstrate an understanding of numbers and counting

Science: 5.2.2: Explore changes in liquids and solids when substances are combined, heated or cooled

 

1

2

3

4

6

 

 

Materials: Recipe, Ingredients, measuring cups, measuring spoons, muffin tin

 

Easy Applesauce Muffins Recipe

Ingredients

3/4 cup sugar

1 cups flour

2 teaspoons baking powder

1 teaspoon ground cinnamon

1/4 teaspoon salt

1 large beaten egg

3/4 cup unsweetened applesauce

1/2 cup butter, melted

Instructions

  1. Heat oven to 375 degrees.
  2. Spray muffin tins with non-stick spray. (We like using a baking spray with flour.)
  3. Mix sugar, flour, baking powder, cinnamon, and salt into a bowl.
  4. In a separate bowl, mix beaten eggs, applesauce, and melted butter.
  5. Combine the dry and wet ingredients.
  6. Scoop mixture into prepared muffin tins.
  7. Bake for 20-24 minutes, or until a toothpick comes out clean.

End

Share the muffins with family members.

Did they like them?

 

 

Social/Emotional

“Bad Apple”  

bad apples

 

3.2: Empathize with feelings of others

Materials: None

Beginning: Read the story 🍎BAD APPLE - A Tale of Friendship by Edward Hemingway

Middle:

Talk with your child about the friendship between Mac and Will.

How were they kind to each other?  Talk with your child about how Mac and Will felt when the other apples were not nice to them.

End:

Ask your child what they could do to make Mac and Will feel welcome.

 

“10 Apples on Top”

book

 

Health, Safety, and Physical Education: 2.4: Develop competence and confidence in activities that require gross and fine motor skills

English Language Arts: RLPK.10: Actively participate in read aloud experiences

 

Materials: Up to 10 sheets of paper

Beginning: Read Ten Apples Up On Top song in the style of Jason Mraz

Middle: Encourage your child to balance sheets of paper on their head while: Walking Slowly,Walking Faster,Running

Increase the number of sheets of paper every time your child is successful.

End: Count how many pieces of paper your child was able to balance.

 

Preschool Plans: Day 15

9/30/20

 

Wednesday Wonders

  1. treeApple trees change throughout the1 3.What treedo you like best? Why?
  2. 2We will move like an treetoday. This is a picture of a pose called “Tree Pose”.Let’s try. 6
  3. tree questionHow have you helped your family with chores? help

 

Language Arts

From Letters to Rhymes”

rhyme

 

RLPK.10: Actively participate in read aloud experiences

RL.PK.2: With prompting and support retell familiar stories

RF.PK.2a: Recognize and produce simple rhyming words

RF.PK.1d: Recognize and name many upper and lowercase letters of the alphabet

Materials:  Rhyming Word List, Crayons, Letter page

Younger Students

Beginning : Read: Apples, Apples, Apples    apples 3

Vocabulary to emphasize and explain: Orchard, tractor, tool, recipe, peel, simmer

Middle: Discuss with your child that you will go on a letter hunt as you re-read the story.  Look for the following letters. Have your child color over each letter as you find it.

letters

 

End: Encourage your child to tell you in their own words what happened in the story. Have them rate the story with a thumbs up or thumbs down.

thumbs

Older Students

 

Beginning: Read Under the Apple Tree, By: Steve Metzger  under apples

Middle: Discuss with your child you will re-read the story but this time you want to find words that rhyme or have a similar ending. As you re-read the story to your child pay close attention to the following sets of words:  Me-Tree. I-High, Leaves-Breeze, Look-Book, Sky-By, Time-Climb, Hide-Wide. Shade-Made, Found-Ground, Nap-Lap, Log-Dog, Pretend-Friend, Sing-Swing

End: Encourage your child to create a word that rhymes with their name.

 

“Counting Colors”

graph

 

4.1.3: Know that written numbers are symbols for number quantities and with support begin to write numbers 1-10

4.3.1: Sort objects

4.1 Demonstrate an understanding of numbers and counting

Materials: Picture of graph, dice, virtual dice link, pencil, paper

Younger Students:

Beginning:

Discuss with your child that apples come in 3 different colors: red, green, and yellow.

Middle:

Show your child the apple graph.graph

Point to the red apple. Encourage your child to find items in your home that are red.

Point to the green apple. Encourage your child to find items in your home that are green.

Point to the yellow apple. Encourage your child to find items in your home that are yellow.

End: Count the number of items in each group.

 

Older Students

Discuss with your child that apples come in 3 different colors: red, green, and yellow.

Middle: Show your child the apple graph. 

 graph

Explain to your child they will roll a dice , count the number of dots, and then find that many items in your home that are red.

Have your child put all red items together.

 

Your child will then roll the dice again , count the number of dots, and then find that many items in your home that are green..

Have your child put all green items together.

 

Your child will then roll the dice again , count the number of dots, and then find that many items in your home that are yellow..

Have your child put all yellow items together.

 

If you do not have dice you can use the link or virtual dice. RANDOM.ORG - Dice Roller

End

Encourage your child to count the number of items in each group. Assist your child as they write each number.

Which group has the most? Which group has the least?

 

 

Social/Emotional

“Positive Vibes Everyday”

vibes

 

.4: Exhibit positive interactions with other children and adults

Materials: None

Keep the following guideline handy to provide you with ideas on encouraging statements to say to  your young learner!

Try to say at least one encouraging statement each day. Invite your child to encourage family members in their activities as well.

Gross Motor

Move Like an Apple

apple smile

 

Visual & Performing Arts: 1.1.1: Move body in a variety of ways with or without music

Health, Safety, and Physical Education:2.4 Develop competence and confidence in activities that require gross and fine motor skills

Materials: None

Beginning: Watch the Apple tree life cycle animation  with your child

Middle:  Encourage your child to move like the tree in the video. Movement suggestions can include:

*Fall like the apple

* Sprout like the tree

* Pretend it's raining

* Move like leaves blowing in the wind

* Move like flowers blooming

*Pretend to be  a bee drinking the flower’s nectar

*Pretend to be a bird flying and then landing on the tree

End

Encourage your child to create and name their own movements.
 

 

Preschool Plans: Day 16 

10/1/20

Thursday Thoughts

 

1Good Morning (Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks) 
2
2 Teacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmate’s letter links using their fingers or props (i.e., holding up each student’s letter link on a popsicle stick)check
 
3Classroom/Home Agreement reminders 
 
4starNewSongmusic note
 
How many leaves do you see?  How many leaves are in the tree?  Let’s all count them, count with me.  How many leaves are in the tree?  Using your fingers to represent numbers count 1-5 with 3-year-olds and 1-10 with 4 year olds who are ready.
?Question of the Day:  Can you show me how old you are using your fingers?

 

 

Language Arts

                                              

“I see Fall”

leaves

SL.PK.2:   Ask and answer questions about a text read aloud or presented orally

Materials: Paper and a writing utensil. I SEE FALL

Beginning: Sit side by side with your child looking at the book or video recording of the book “I see Fall”.  Model asking: What.. Doing? And then responding while using present progressive -ing.  For example Parent: What is the squirrel doing?  Child: The squirrel is climbing on the branch.

Middle: Tell your child: It’s your turn now. Point to a picture and ask me What is … doing?

The parent then answers while using the present progressive form.

End: Practice the same skill while looking at scenes around you while walking outside.

 

Younger children:  Practice question: What...doing?   Older children: Ask how and Why questions. For example: Why are the leaves changing colors?   Why is the squirrel digging and hiding acorns?
 
 

Math

Leaf Count

count

M: 4.1.3 Know that written numbers are symbols for number quantities and, with support, begin to write numbers from 0 to 10.

V/PA: 5.2.1 Observe, manipulate, sort, and describe objects and materials (e.g., water, sand, clay, paint, glue, various types of blocks, collections of objects, simple household items that can be taken apart, or objects made of wood, metal, or cloth) in the classroom and outdoor environment based on size, shape, color, texture, and weight.

Materials:  Paper or real leave,  Counting Fall Leaves

Beginning:  Take a nature walk with your child where they will be able to collect leaves.  If a walk is not possible, use paper to represent leaves. (save your leaves for additional activities).

Middle:  After collecting your leaves ask your child, “How many leaves are in your pile.”  Allow your child to attempt to count the leaves.  If your child has difficulty, have them repeat after you, as you model.

End:  Ask your child: How do the leaves feel? What colors do you see in your pile?
 

Social/Emotional

 

Fall/Changes Social Survey Part 1:

leaves

S: 5.1.3 Children develop inquiry skills. Use basic science terms and topic-related science vocabulary weather terms.

Beginning:   Help your child draw a representation of each season in a quadrant.

Middle:   Ask your child about his favorite season. Help him draw a happy face in the appropriate quadrant and a sad face for his least favorite season.

End:  Discuss your feelings about each season: For example, your favorite things to do or eat.

 

Younger  children: Have your child share their feelings about one season.
 
 

Gross Motor Skills

Autumn Moves

jump leaves

 

V/PA: 1.1.1 Move the body in a variety of ways, with and without music.

H/S/PE: 2.4.1 Develop and refine gross-motor skills (e.g., hopping, galloping, jumping, running, and marching).

Beginning:   Invite your child to join you for some movement activities

Middle: Grow tall like a tree (stretching arms up high)

Let your leaves fall (slowly lower arms and touch toes)

Roll like pumpkin (arm circles)

Jump in the leaf pile (jump 5 times)

Twirl around like the wind (spin)

End:  Invite your child to create their own movement 

Older children:  Add gross motor movements such as balance on one leg, stretch on tippy toes, walk on a line.
 

 

Fragile Friday

 

sun morningGood Morning!

(Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks) harmonyTeacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmate’s letter links using  their fingers or props (i.e., holding up each student’s letter link on a popsicle stick)

2Classroom/Home Agreement reminderscheck

3“Fragile”leaves

 Explain the meaning of the word fragile. Ask children to suggest things that are fragile. Share them with others by showing them in front of the camera, if possible.    Introduce Fall Leaves. Show how fragile they are by breaking them.

 

Math

Pronouns and Fall Clothing Vocabulary:

L.PK.4. Begin to determine the meaning of new words L.PK.5. Begin to sort familiar objects

Materials: Variety of Fall clothing items.

Beginning: Present your child with clothes and accessories used in the fall season: sweater, light jacket, light scarf…

Middle: Sort items while stating who they belong to. For example, This is my scarf. This is your sweater.

End: Expose your child to the new vocabulary words by repeating them as much as possible during the day. For example: “Hang your jacket and mine”.

Younger children:  Have your child practice this skill at least 3 items.   Older children: Have your child practice this skill with at least 5 items.

 

Looking at Leaves

 

S/E 0.1.3: Actively engage in activities and interactions with teachers and peers

S: 5.2.1 Observe, manipulate, sort, and describe objects and materials (e.g., water, sand, clay, paint, glue, various types of blocks, collections of objects, simple household items that can be taken apart, or objects made of wood, metal, or cloth) in the classroom and outdoor environment based on size, shape, color, texture, and weight.

Materials:  Collection of leaves for  a magnifying glasses (if available), a piece of paper, and marker

Beginning:  Begin by giving a child one leaf to examine using a magnifying glass. On a larger piece of paper, write down the words your child used to describe their leaves.  Draw children’s attention to the common attributes that all the leaves possess as well as the differences children mention about their leaves

Middle: Give your child a small pile of leaves to examine. Ask children whether they can find leaves that are the same in some ways. Watch how children group their leaves. Look for size and shape. Repeat with descriptive labels.

End:  Ask the child to help you add more words about leaves to the paper. Invite a child to choose a favorite leaf to tell you about.

Older children: Continue with other objects like: different sized twigs, different sized train toys, etc.
 

        Fall/Changes SocialSurvey Part 2:

 

    S.5.1.4  Children develop inquiry skills. Communicate with other children and adults to share observations, pursue              questions, make predictions and/or conclusions.

Beginning: Prepare your child for the Season Survey by practicing initiating a topic and asking sample questions:

For example: “I noticed the weather changed. It’s Fall!. Fall is my favorite season because I get to collect colored leaves. What’s your favorite season?...”

Middle:  Assist your child in asking each family member, and other people (via phone or video) about their favorite season.

Draw happy and sad faces in each quadrant to record responses.

End:  Tally the number of happy and sad faces in each quadrant.

Older children: Have your child write the total number of tally marks for each season.  Then ask them which season had the greatest number of people and which season had the least number of people.
 

Gross Motor

Fall Yoga  

yoga

H/S/PE: 2.4.1 Develop and refine gross-motor skills (e.g., hopping, galloping, jumping, running, and marching).

Beginning:  Invite your child to join you for some stretching exercises called yoga.

Middle: 

Scarecrow:

  1. Stand with your feet shoulder with apart
  2. Move your arms out slightly like a scarecrow
  3. Breath in and out. Sway side to side in the wind.

Leaf

  1. Stand with your feet shoulder width apart.
  2. Reach your hands out to the side as far as you can.
  3. Remember to stand nice and tall, move your hands to a resting position on your knees
  4. Repeat

End:  Repeat each activity once

 

Older children:

Trying adding one more pose

Falling Leaves

1.Sit with your legs criss-cross and your back straight

2.Raise your hands over our heads.

3.Flutter your fingers like falling leaves
 

Monday Message

 

  1. 1Good Morning! (Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks)- 2Teacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmates letter links   using their fingers or props (i.e., holding up each student’s letterlink on a popsicle stick)
  2. 2Classroom/Home Agreement reminders checklist
  3. 3Teacher can then lead an introductory to 10 little leaves Finger play (with the option to act out with their parents later on in the day gross motorfor Gross Motor)

Language Arts

Spatial Concepts Fall Hide and Seek:

squirrel

L.PK.1.: Begin to understand the conventions of standard English grammar when speaking during interactions and activities

Materials: Paper and a writing utensil.

Beginning: Draw a picture of a squirrel and cut it out. You can also pick any stuffed animal teh child has and pretend it is a squirrel. Help your child cut out or rip off a variety of shaped paper, which will represent acorns.

Middle: Hide the “acorns” around the house.  Tell your child: “I am going to hide acorns around the house. Then, I am going to tell you and your squirrel where to find them”.  Use a variety of spatial concepts to describe your hiding spots: “In, Over, Under, Behind, Between…”.

End:  Say: “Now it’s your turn to hide the acorns. Now, tell me and the squirrel where to find them”. If your child points to a location, help him/her describe it.  

 

Younger children:  Ask the child to find one acorn at the time. Older children: Hide 2 acorns, and ask your child to find them by following a two step command.
 
 

Math

10 Little Leaves  

little leaves

 

M: 4.4.1 Respond to and use positional words (e.g., in, under, between, down, behind).

M: 4.1.4 Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities

Materials:  Preschool Songs for Fall - 10 Little Leaves - Littlestorybug

Beginning:  Hold up both hands and wiggle all 10 fingers.  Explain to your child they are going to pretend their body is a tree with its leaves falling down. 

Middle:  (As you count use your fingers to represent each leaf) One little, two little, three little leaves. Four little, five little, six little leaves.

Seven little, eight little, nine little leaves. 10 little leaves falling from the tree.  

End: Repeat the fingerplay allowing your child to sing the words alone.

 

Older children: Sing the song again, except this time count backwards from 10-1
 

Social-Emotional

Self-Portrait:

silly face

S 5.1.1  Communicate with other children and adults to share observation, pursue questions, and or conclusions

Materials: Reference to this site if needed  😃 Emoji People and Smileys Meanings

Beginning: Ahead of time parents will draw different emoji (emotional faces) characters on different sheets of paper. Try to include at least 6 basic feeling words such as happy, mad, sad and scared. Some children can even benefit from learning more complex feeling words such as frustrated, disappointed, and nervous. Make sure to explain the formats of their eyes, nose, mouth, of the emoji characters drawn.

Middle: To engage our students, parents will need to pre-cut those facial parts and then spread the pieces of the face around the table and have the students search for them. Once they collected their pieces they can glue it on their self-portrait outlines. You can also provide students with crayons so they can color in their face and hair if they may choose to do so.

End: Parents can write down on separate pieces of paper what their child says when they ask them, “What do you use your eyes for? Nose, and mouth? As children describe their work make sure to incorporate all their senses

 

Older children: Have your child look in a mirror while sitting next to a family member.  Ask them to pick out facial features that are similar or different from that family member
 

Gross Motor

Neighborhood Obstacle Course

motor skills

H/S/PE: 2.4.1 Develop and refine gross-motor skills (e.g., hopping, galloping, jumping, running, and marching).

Beginning:   Invite your child to join you on a walk outside.

Middle:   As you walk around your neighborhood or local park add in marching, jogging, skipping, hopping, balance on a line with arms extended, or jump into leaf piles.

End: Discuss your adventure with your child.  What was his/her favorite part? What colors did they notice?  Did they see anything interesting?

 

Older children encourage your child to take wide steps, giant leaps, or practice walking backwards( in a safe spot)
 

Tuesday Turtles

      

1. turtleGood Morning!sun

(Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks)  -Teacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmates letter links using their fingers or props (i.e., holding up each student’s letterlink on a popsicle stick

2. breakfastWhat did you have for breakfast this morning?

                               

3. songNewsong   Song    

 

Breakfast Fingerplay:

“Everybody wake up in the morning, Everybody’s hungry I know, Everybody wake up in the morning, It’s breakfast time let’s go!” “What did you have for breakfast this morning?” Teacher will lead and model discussion by explaining her breakfast, who she ate with, how she made it, etc.

     

4. turtlesCan you move like a turtle?turtle

 

Closing- teacher can suggest students can move/act like a turtle before leaving virtual  meeting or video (engaging them for Tucker Turtle lesson for the day)
 

Language Arts

What color leaf did you find?

leaves

 

RI.K.10: Actively participate in read aloud experiences using age appropriate information books individually and in small and large groups.

Materials:  Paper and crayons.  Leaves by David Ezra Stein

Beginning: To engage our students into a leaf investigation, begin today’s study of leaves by reading the wonderful book titled, “Leaves' ' by David Ezra Stein. “Leaves” is a book about a little bear experiencing his very first season of fall.

Middle: After you read the story ask your children to help you fill up a zip-lock bag of leaves on a short community walk outside around the block, or if you have outdoor space, utilize it. As children begin to find different colored leaves talk about how different each one is to another. Once you bring in

all the colored leaves inside your house, make sure to sort them into red leaves, yellow leaves, and green leaves. By creating a visual representation of how all the leaves looked our students will learn that in the Fall, leaves change colors and they all come in different shades. You may choose to do this by creating your own graph at home with paper and markers.

End: Give children red, yellow, orange, and brown colored crayons and have them draw out different sized leaves by observing their graph.

 

Younger children:  Assist your child in counting and labeling how many leaves of each color they found.  Older children:  Have your child count and label how many leaves of each color they found.
 

Math

There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed Some Leaves!

book

 

RL.PK.3 With prompting and support, identify characters, settings, and major events in a familiar story.

RI.K.10  Actively participate in read aloud experiences using age appropriate information books individually and in small and large groups

Materials: There Was An Old Lady Who Swallowed Some Leaves - Kids Books Read Aloud

Beginning: Watch the read aloud “There Was An Who Swallowed Some Leaves” with your child by clicking the link

Middle: Use the pictures below to talk about the sequence of events in the story.  Use words such as first, next, and last.

middle

 End:  Invite your child to retell the story in his/her words.  Using the pictures can help then remember the order the old lady swallowed the items..

 

Younger children:

Sequence the story events with your child. Use 3 pictures for a beginning, middle and end of the story.

Older children:

Challenge your child by adding more pictures to sequence

 

Social/Emotional

Tucker Turtle

tucker

S/E 0.3.3  Children demonstrate and express feelings. Channel impulses and negative feelings, such as anger.

Materials:  Tucker Turtle Takes Time to Tuck and Think

Beginning: Discuss that sometimes things happen that make us feel upset.  Think of an example of when something happened to you that made you upset.

Middle: Read the story of Tucker the Turtle to see what Tucker does when he feels upset. Tucker Turtle Takes Time to Tuck and Think

End: After reading, practice stopping,  tucking and counting to 3, and then thinking of a solution to a problem. 

 

Younger children: Give your child an example of a problem, such as; their brother/sister will not share a toy with them.  Model how to stop, tuck, and count to 3.  Have your child practice these steps with you.  Then explain how you would solve the problem.

 

 

Gross Motor

More Fall Yoga

 gross motor

H/S/PE: 2.4.1 Develop and refine gross-motor skills (e.g., hopping, galloping, jumping, running, and marching).

Beginning: Invite your child to join you for some stretching exercises called yoga.

Middle:

Pumpkin

  1. Start by laying on your back
  2. Pull your knees up to your tummy
  3. Rock side to side on the floor like your a pumpkin

Rake:

  1. Sit up tall with your legs out in front of you
  2. Move your arms side to side like you are raking leaves

End: Repeat each activity once

 

Older children:

  1. Sit up tall with your legs out in front of you
  2. Move your arms side to side like you are raking leaves

Try the same pose while standing tall.

 

 

Preschool Plans: Day 20

10/7/20

 

Wonderful Wednesday

 

1. morningGood Morning!

(Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks) harmony     

2. 2“Did you use soap when you washed your hands this morning? Teacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmates letter links using their fingers or props (i.e.,  holding

up each student’s letterlink on a popsicle stick)

Teacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmates using their fingers or props (i.e.,   

holding up each student’s letterlink on a popsicle stick)

3. 3 New  music Song   “Wash your Hands” Fingerplay:

(to the tune of Row, Row, Row Your Boat)

“Wash, wash, wash your hands. Wash them nice and clean, Scrub them here (hand motion scrubbing together)

 Scrub them there (hand motion scrubbing together) And scrub them in between. Wash, wash, wash, your hands, Play

our handy game. Rub and scrub, scrub and rub. Germs go down the drain!”

 

Math

Exploring Fruits and Vegetables

fruit

H/S/P/E: 2.2.1 Explore foods and food groups (e.g., compare and contrast foods representative of various cultures by taste, color, texture, smell, and shape).   H/S/PE: 2.2.2 Develop awareness of nutritious food choices (e.g., participate in classroom cooking activities, hold conversations with knowledgeable adults about daily nutritious meals and snack offerings).

MaterialsWeekly supermarket flyer or google images of fruit and vegetables found in your home

Beginning:  Talk with your child about eating healthy. Discuss different fruits and vegetables found during your meals and snacks.

 

Middle: As you both look at the pictures,  name each fruit and veggie. 

End: Use available fruit or vegetables in the home, create a healthy snack together.

 

Social-Emotional

Me Bag

like me

 

S/S 6.1.1Children identify unique characteristics of themselves, their families, and others. Describe characteristics of oneself, one’s family, and others.

Materials:  I Like Me!

Beginning: Start by reading the book I Like Me!

Middle: Each student in our class is different.  In a bag gather a few items with a family member that represent you!

End: Save the items to share during a classroom greeting time.

 

Older children: Have your child select their favorite item from the bag.  Next invite them to share with family members in the house, or call a friend/family member to share how the item represents them.

 

Gross Motor

JUMP ON IN!

gross motor

H/S/PE: 2.4.1 Develop and refine gross-motor skills (e.g., hopping, galloping, jumping, running, and marching).  V/PA: 1.1.1 Move the body in a variety of ways, with and without   V/PA:1.2.3 Clap or sing songs with repetitive phrases and rhythmic patterns music.

Materials:  Autumn Leaves are Falling Down

Beginning: Play video so you and your child can sing while doing the actions.

Middle: (raise both arms about your head and turn palms front to back)
Autumn leaves are changing colors, changing colors, changing colors. Autumn leaves are changing colors, all over town. Autumn leaves are changing color, changing colors, changing colors.  Autumn leaves are changing colors, all over town.
(Flutter your fingers while moving your arms up and down)
Autumn Leaves are falling down, falling down, falling down .  Autumn leaves are falling down, down to the ground. Autumn leaves are falling down, falling down, falling down.  Autumn leaves are falling down, down to the ground
(Moving arms forwards and backwards) Take a rake and rake them up, rake them up, rake them up. Take a rake and rake them up, down on the ground. Take a rake and rake them up, rake them up, rake them up. Take a rake and rake them up, down on the ground.
(Jump in place) Make a pile and jump in, and jump in, and jump in. Make a pile and jump on in, down on the ground. Make a pile and jump in, and jump in, and jump in. Make a pile and jump in, on the ground.

End:  Repeat the activity.  Ask your child what their favorite move is?

 

Older children: Invite your child to create new movements for the action song.

 

                                                                 Preschool Plans: Day 21

10/8/20

Thursday Thinkers

 

1.sunGood Morning!

(Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks)

1. 1Teacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmates letter links using their fingers or props (i.e., holding up each student’s letterlink on a popsicle stick

2. 2Classroom/Home Agreement reminders

-Teacher can draw the daily routine symbol for Cleanup Time on a piece of paper or a board, writing the word clean up underneath it.

3. 3“What will you clean up today?”

-Teacher can model cleaning up something simple in her work area at home (i.e, putting pencils into a pencil case) before encouraging students to take turns showing something they use often in their house (i.e., their favorite toy, their favorite cup or bowl in the kitchen) and putting it away.4

 

Fire Safety

W.PK.5 With guidance and support, share a drawing with dictation, scribble-writing, letter-strings, or invented spelling to describe an event, real or imagined.

Materials:  Paper and a writing utensil.  Fire Safety book reading

fire truck

Beginning:  Discuss the importance of not playing with matches, lighters, firecrackers, etc. or watch the read aloud.

Middle:  Take a piece of paper and fold it in half.  Label one side Safe and the other side Not Safe.  Brainstorm things that are safe for your child to play with and have them draw a few pictures on the Safe side.  Then brainstorm items that are not safe to play with and have your child draw a few pictures on the Not Safe side.

End:  Older children can label what they drew.  Have them say the word slowly and write down the sounds they hear.  Younger children can tell you what they drew and you can write it down for them.  Send me some pictures of what you drew!

 

Math

How many shapes do you see?

firefighter

M: 4.4.2 Use accurate terms to name and describe some two-dimensional shapes and begin to use accurate terms to name and describe some three-dimensional shapes (e.g., circle, square, triangle, sphere, cylinder, cube, side point, angle)

Beginning: Looking at the picture of the firetruck above.  Ask your child what shapes they see. How many circles? How many rectangles? How many squares?

Middle: After your child identifies the shapes, with your help as needed, have them trace the outline of the shape with their finger.  Guide their finger if needed.

End:  Invite your child to draw the shapes on a piece of paper. 

 

Younger children: Start the activity by only looking for a circle and a square.  If your child is ready introduce him/her to rectangles.

Older children: Using paper and crayons/pencils/pens, encourage your child to create a drawing with shapes.

 

 

Social-Emotional

I like Myself

book

S/S 6.1.1 Children identify unique characteristics of themselves, their families, and others. Describe characteristics of oneself, one’s family, and others.

Materials:  I Like Myself

Beginning: Watch the youtube read aloud book  “I Like Myself”

Middle: Ask your child to recall what the character likes about herself. You can go back to the video and pause it after every page read.

End: Ask your child what he/she likes about herself/himself. Help your child build their self esteem by brainstorming what they are good at and their beautiful features.

 

Older children: Encourage your child to draw a representation of their thoughts. Remember to continue building your child’s self esteem throughout the days. Describe their efforts and accomplishments, and help them reflect on their actions,  realistically evaluate whether they’ve achieved their own objectives… so they can decide for themselves how they feel about their outcomes.

 

Gross Motor

Stop, Drop, and Roll

 

SS: 6.3.2 Identify, discuss, and role-play the duties of a range of community workers.

H/S/PE: 2.3.2 Develop an awareness of warning symbols and their meaning (e.g., red light, stop sign, poison symbol, etc.).

H/S/PE:  2.3.3 Identify community helpers who assist in maintaining a safe environment. H/S/PE:  2.3.4 Know how to dial 911 for help.

Materials:  Stop, Drop & Roll

Beginning: View the video about fire safety with your child. 

Middle: Discuss the importance of staying safe with your child.  Practice the steps of  stop, drop, and roll.

If your clothing catches on fire
  1. STOP what you're doing (tape a piece of paper on your child)
  2. DROP to the ground
  3. ROLL around to put the fire out (paper falls off their clothing
  4. Cool area with cold water
  5. Adult calls 911
 
End: Talk about how firefighters are our friends.  They help us when there is trouble with fire.

 

Older children:  Sequence steps using the pictures below.

 

stop

 

Plans: Day 22

 10/9/20

 

 Friday Fun

 

1. sunGood Morning!

Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks

1. harmonyTeacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmates letter links using their fingers or props (i.e., holding up each student’s letterlink on a popsicle stick)
2. checlistClassroom/Home Agreement reminders
3. school”It’s Friday! Let’s get ready for the weekend!”
(No School Monday)

4. 4“ How are you feeling this morning?”

 

-Teacher can lead discussion using visuals (i.e., picture of smiling face, excited face, etc.) She can hold the visual up to her while modeling the emotion and explaining why she is feeling that emotion. I.e., “I’m feeling excited because it is Friday and it’s a sunny day outside! Can you show me an excited face?” Teachers can then encourage students to make an excited face.

-Each student can identify and explain the emotion that they are feeling this morning before giving the rest of the class the opportunity to join in on showing what that emotion looks like

 

 

Language Arts

Fire Safety 

 

firefighter

W.PK.5 With guidance and support, share a drawing with dictation, scribble-writing, letter-strings, or invented spelling to describe an event, real or imagined.

Materials:  Paper and a writing utensil.   Firefighters PDF poem

Beginning:  Recite this fire safety poem with your child: Firefighters wear big red hats.  Climb up ladders to rescue cats.  Ride big trucks with big black tires.  Use big hoses to spray fires.  Race when they hear fire alarms, To help keep people safe from harm. 

Middle:  Discuss the responsibilities that firefighters have.  Ask your child what are some ways firefighters keep us safe.

End:  Have your child draw a picture of a firefighter keeping us safe.

 

Younger children:  Have your child dictate a sentence to go with their picture and write it down for them. 

Older children:  Have your child dictate a sentence to go with their picture and independently write any of the sounds that they can hear themselves.

 

Climb The Ladder  

ladder

 

M: 4.4.1 Respond to and use positional words (e.g., in, under, between, down, behind). M:4.1.1 Count to 20 by ones with minimal prompting.

Materials:To prep for this activity draw a simple ladder, the numbers 1-6 written on paper, a drawing of two “firefighters”

Beginning:Invite your child to pretend to be a firefighter, along with you. Explain you are going to race to the top of the ladder. 

Middle:Place the number cards facing downward. Take turns selecting a card.  The number selected is how many rung your firefighter can climb up. Each rung you climb, count out loud with your child.

End:The game is finished when both firefighters reach the top.

 

Younger children: Start with small numbers such as 1,2,3.   

Older children:   Challenge your child to count up to 20.
 
 

Social Emotional

When Sophie Gets Angry 

 sophie angry

S/E 0.3.3 Children demonstrate and express feelings. Channel impulses and negative feelings, such as anger.

Materials:  When Sophie Gets Angry

Beginning: Start by reading the book “When Sophie Gets Angry- Really, Really, Angry”

Middle: Discuss with someone in your family how Sophie felt in the story.  What did Sophie do to calm down?

End: Over the next few days we are going to talk more about what we can do when we feel upset.
 

Gross Motor

Smoke Crawl 

crawl

 

SS: 6.3.2 Identify, discuss, and role-play the duties of a range of community workers.  M: 4.4.1 Respond to and use positional words (e.g., in, under, between, down, behind).

Materials:  Crawl Low in Smoke

Beginning:  View the video about how to get out of a smoky place with your child.

Middle:  Hang a dark sheet (if you have one available)  over a piece of furniture.  Allow some space between the sheet and the floor as shown

End:  Invite your child to practice practicecrawling low on the ground.  Get down on your hands and knees, keep your head up, and crawl.

 

Preschool Plans: Day 23

 10/13/20

Tuesday Talk

1. microphoneGood Morning!

(Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks) -Teacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmates letter links using their fingers or props (i.e., holding up each student’s letterlink on a popsicle stick)

2. 2 microphonesClassroom/Home Agreement reminders

 

3. 3 microphonbesNew  Song      music      “Today is Song”                                                      

 

Frère Jacques (Instrumental)

(To the tune of “Frere Jacque”)

Today is Monday

Today is Monday

All day long, all day long!

Yesterday was Sunday

Tomorrow will be Tuesday

Oh what fun!

Oh what fun!

 

 

 

Language Arts

Fire Safety

                                                              

firefighter

RF.PK.1.d Recognize and name many upper and lower case letters of the alphabet.

Materials:  Paper and a writing utensil.  Firefighters PDF poem

Beginning: Write out and recite this fire safety poem: Firefighters wear big red hats.  Climb up ladders to rescue cats.  Ride big trucks with big black tires.  Use big hoses to spray fires.  Race when they hear fire alarms, To help keep people safe from harm.  

Middle:  Using the written poem, show your child the lowercase version of the first letter in their name. Have your child search for the first letter of their name and underline it each time they find it.  If your child’s name begins with J, Q, V, X, or Z, you can select a different letter that your child is familiar with to search for.

End:  Discuss the words that contain your child’s letter. 

 

Younger children:  Your child can practice writing their lowercase letter.

Older children:  Your child can practice writing their lowercase letter or they may copy the words they found their letter in.  If appropriate, they can draw a picture to go with it.

 

How many smoke detectors?

 smoke detector

M: 4.1.2 Recognize and name one-digit written numbers up to 10 with minimal prompting. M: 4.1.3 Know that written numbers are symbols for number quantities and, with support, begin to write numbers from 0 to 10. M .3 4.1.4 Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities

 

Materials:  Fire Safety Video

Beginning: Watch a short video on YouTube. Talk about video with children.

Middle: Ask children to walk around their house and count how many detectors they can find.

End: Can you write the number? Ask children if they can write how many detectors they have found. If they cannot write the number, encourage them to draw how many they found (they can draw anything to show the quantity). Count with them and model writing numbers.

Younger children - Can you draw how many you found?   

Older children - Can you identify (show them numbers) the number you counted and can you write it?

 

 

Social-Emotional

Creating a Cozy Corner

cozy corner

 

S/E 0.3.3 Children demonstrate and express feelings. Channel impulses and negative feelings, such as anger (taking three deep breaths, using calming words, pulling self out of play to go to a safe spot to relax, expressive activities.

Materials:  When Sophie Gets Angry

Beginning: Yesterday we read the book “When Sophie Gets Angry- Really, Really, Angry.”  Re-read the book today.

Middle: Sophie ran away to a place that made her feel calm.  Where is a place in your house that you can go that will make you feel calm when you get upset?  With the help of a family member, find a cozy corner in your house.  Add a few items that help you feel calm for example a stuffed animal or a soft pillow.

 

 

End: Explain to your child that the next time cornerthey feel upset they have the option to go to their cozy corner until they feel calm.

Older children Work together with your child to put together a small picture book with pictures of family, friends, nature, etc. that help your child feel calm.

 

Animal Rescue 

 

aninal rescue

SS: 6.3.2 Identify, discuss, and role-play the duties of a range of community workers. M: 4.4.1 Respond to and use positional words (e.g., in, under, between, down, behind). H/S/PE: 2.4.1 Develop and refine gross-motor skills (e.g., hopping, galloping, jumping, running, and marching)

Beginning:  Create FireFighter life nets with a piece of material such as small sheets or plastic tablecloths.  Allow your child to select his/her favorite stuffed animal to join the game.

Middle: You and your child each grab on end of the material.  You should be able to move the material up and down with your arms.  Place the stuffed animal in the center bouncing it up and down.  You and your child can pretend to be firefighters saving  the stuffed animal by catching it on the net.

End: Continue practicing to save your animal.  Throw it up into the air and use teamwork to move your lifenet to catch it.

 

Younger children:    Use a larger object to make catching it easier.

 

 

 

Preschool Plans: Day 24

10/14/20

 

Wonderful Wednesday

1. morningGood Morning!

(Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks)Teacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmates letter links using their fingers or props (i.e., holding up each student’s letterlink on a popsicle stick)

2. 2Did you wash your hands today?

           new song   

 

We start each day by washing our hands, by washing our hands each day.

We wash away the icky germs, sneezy germs, the sticky germs.

So if you are a squirmy germ,

I’m happy to explain that we start each day by washing our hands to wash you drain!

3. 3Simon Says Class Agreementslists

(Teacher can use Simon Says to remind students of their Agreements for the day while preparing them for Simon Says Song they will use later on in the day)

(I.e., Simon Says turn on your listening ears)

 

 

Language Arts

Letter Yoga

yoga

RF.PK.3,a Associates many letters (consonants and vowels as ready) with their names and their most frequent sounds.

Materials: Letter cards   Alphabet Yoga

Beginning: Give children different “Yoga Cards” that have letter positions on them.  Go over with each student’s letter card. Focus on the letters found in their name specifically.

Middle: Walk over to an empty place in your house. Begin to lay on the floor and invite your child to join you for some yoga. Say, we are going to do some yoga poses in the shape of letters of the alphabet.” As you model, invite your child to mimic you and then select their favorite.

A – Airplane (hold still and move arms to the side), B –Bicycle (lie on your back and pedal your feet), C – Cat pose (get on all fours; then round your back while tucking in your chin; release)

End: Bring out their letter link symbol card and have them create the yoga letter poses of their name. You may want to take a picture of the stretches made by the child so they  have something to refer to when they play this game another time.

 

Younger children:  Have your child identify 2 letters and create the poses.

Older children:  Have your child identify 5 letters and create the poses.

 

Math

Sorting Shapes

sorting

 

M 4.4. Children develop spatial and geometric sense.

Materials:  Mouse Shapes

Beginning: Read story, “Mouse Shapes”, by Ellen Walsh to hook students into today’s activity. Students will be working to recognize the many shapes in their environment. To begin this activity parents will need to walk around their house with their child and identify the different shapes such as circles, triangles, and squares.

Middle: Learning shapes not only helps children identify and organize visual information, it helps them learn skills in others. Learning shapes also help children understand new vocabulary. Ahead of time parents can either print out different shapes that they will use to tape around the house when they match that shape found, or make them their own shapes with construction paper.  [ Open- Ended]

End: Parent will let child become the teacher as they will now carry a basket filled with different cut out shapes they want the parents to identify. You may want to continue this for 3 rounds to extend play.

 

 

Social -Emotional

Make a list of calming activities 

 

 list

S/E0.3.3 Children demonstrate and express feelings. Channel impulses and negative feelings, such as anger.

Beginning:For the past two days we have been talking about Sophie from the book “When Sophie Gets Angry- Really, Really, Angry.” Remind your child what Sophie did when she felt angry (ran away to a safe place).

Middle: Once Sophie was in a safe space she looked around and saw the trees and birds and water and it made her feel calm.  With your child, make a list of calming activities that they can do in their cozy corner.  Examples might include; squeezing a ball, hugging a pillow or stuffed animal, pushing a wall, taking 3 deep breaths.  Gather any materials for ideas on the list.

End: After making the list of calming activities, practice doing one or more of the activities with your child.

 

Younger children: Model for your child how they could use each of the items they selected for their cozy corner.

 

Gross Motor

Simon Says

 

simon says

M: 4.1.4 Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities .  M: 4.4.2 Use accurate terms to name and describe some two-dimensional shapes and begin to use accurate terms to name and describe some three-dimensional shapes (e.g., circle, square, triangle, sphere, cylinder, cube, side point, angle).

Materials: paper with various shapes drawn on it. Circle, triangle, square, rectangle.  Information for parent(s):How to Play Simon Says

Simon Says Song for Children by Patty Shukla

Beginning: Start out by stretching and moving your body while counting 1-10.  Turn around 2 times. Stomp your feet 5 times. Touch your toes 3 times. Clap your hands 7 times

Middle: Then practice playing Simon Says with your child. Model and explain they shouldn’t do the action if they don’t hear “Simon Says”

Simon says hop 2 times (hop two times)

Simon Says put your hands up high (put hands up)

Run in place (don’t move)

Place the shape pictures on the floor. 

Invite your child to move different ways to get to a shape.

Simon Says hop to the circle-count how many hops it takes

Simon Says twist to the rectangle

End: Continue the game until each shape is called.  Vary directions using “simon says” and not using “simon says”

 

Older children: add more shapes to challenge your child.  Oval, diamond, octagon

 

Preschool Plans: Day 25

10/15/20 

Thursday Thoughts
1. triangle sunGood Morning!
(Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks)
harmony-Teacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmates letter links using their fingers or props (i.e., holding up each student’s letterlink on a popsicle stick)
2. 2Did you dress yourself this morning?
dress
(Teacher can lead discussion by modeling and bringing other elements into the conversation, i.e., “I felt chilly this morning, so I buttoned up my
3. 3

Five Little Shapes by Susan Oldham Hill

Five little shapes in the world today.

Can you see them as you play?

One little square is a window to the sky.  square

One little triangle is the roof so high.triangle

One little circle is a cookie so sweet. circle

One little rectangle is a cracker to eat.rectangle

And one little diamond is a kite in the clouds.diamond

 

Can you say them all out loud?

(Teacher can use shape cards, hand drawn shapes as visuals to go along with the song)
 
 
Language Arts

Shapes 

shapes

 

 

RF.PK.3.a  Associates many letters (consonants and vowels as ready) with their names and their most frequent sounds.

SL.PK.5 Use drawings or visual displays to add to descriptions to provide additional detail.

Materials:  Paper, writing utensils and scissors.   Walter's Wonderful Web

Beginning:  Read the following story starter or listen to the read aloud of Walter’s Wonderful Web:  Walter the Spider kept trying to spin a good web but the wind kept blowing them away.  First, he spun a triangle web but the wind blew it down.  He tried making a square, rectangle, diamond and circle web.  The wind blew them all down.  Walter thought about all the shapes he used to make his webs before and came up with a great idea!  He worked really hard and spun a web that used all the shapes.  It was beautiful!  The wind blew but Walter’s web was nice and strong.  It was a truly wonderful web!

Middle:  Cut a piece of paper up into 10 squares.  Draw each one of these shapes onto a piece of paper: triangle, square, rectangle, diamond and circle.  Label each shape with it’s written name underneath it using a capital letter to start each word.  For older children, write these letters onto the rest of the paper squares: T, S, R, D and C.  For younger children, draw two sets of shapes.  Tell your child, “We’re going to play a game!  I’ll put all these papers face down and we’ll take turns picking up two at a time to try and find a match.”

End:  Play the game a few times or as long as your child is enjoying it.  Older children can draw the shape and write the first letter next to it on a piece of paper.  Send me a picture of all the matches that you found!

 

Younger children: Have your child match the shapes to each other.  Be sure to point out the name of the shapes as you’re playing.  You can also point out that the first letters are the same on each paper when they make a match.

Older children: Have your child match the first letter to the shape name.
 
 
Math
What can we make with shapes? 
 
 shapes 

M: 4.4.2 Use accurate terms to name and describe some two-dimensional shapes and begin to use accurate terms to name and describe some three-dimensional shapes  M: 4.4.3 Manipulate, compare and discuss the attributes of: (a) two-dimensional shapes . (b) three-dimensional shapes by building with blocks and with other materials having height, width and depth.

Materials can be: paper, crayons/markers/pencil, any kind of sticks, straws, yarn, string, pasta or pre cut shapes, legos/building blocks, playdough.

Beginning: Provide children with materials. Ask children if they can make a shape with the materials or draw shapes to create a picture.

Examples:

Middle: As children are working on creating shapes, mention what you see them doing and give them more materials if needed. Have conversations about where we can find shapes.

End: Ask children to talk about what they have made with their shapes. Encourage children to identify the shapes they used or put together to make new shapes.

 

Younger children - Provide pre cut shapes for children to be able to identify with and make a picture using those shapes.Older children- Provide materials and encourage them to create a shape with those materials.
 
 

Social-Emotional

 

 Interviewing family members about feelings related to fire

 

family

 

S/E0.3.1 Children demonstrate and express feelings. Recognize and describe a wide range of feelings, including sadness, anger, fear, and happiness.

Beginning: This week we talked a bit about fire safety and how firefighters help keep us safe. Today we are going to talk about fire and how that makes us feel.

Middle:Fire might make different people feel different ways. Ask people in your family what they feel about fire and why.  Draw a picture of how fire makes you feel.

End: Share with someone in your family your picture and explain how fire makes you feel.
 
Gross Motor
Acka Backa
 
harmony

RF.PK.3 c Recognize their name in print as well as other familiar print in the environment.

 

Beginning: Review your child’s letter link symbol and printed name.  Create two or three other letter links (name labels) , write the name and draw a simple picture of something that begins with the same sound. Example: 

Brianna Bracelet  bracelet

Middle:

Acka Backa Soda Cracker

Acka Backa Boo

Acka Backa Soda Cracker Let’s dance a move or two!

Show the child his/her letter link and invite them to move their body in a fun way. 

End: Add a few other names to the game.  This will help your child decipher their own name.

Older childrenReview and add a letter link to represent your child’s last name.  moonMartinez

 

Preschool Plan Day 26

10/16/20

 

 

Friday Feelings
1. smileGood Morning!
smile(Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks)
-harmonyTeacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmates letter links using their fingers or props (i.e., holding up each student’s letterlink on a popsicle stick)
poster
2. 2 How are you Feeling today?
3. 3“It’s Friday! Let’s get ready for the weekend!”
no school
(Closing- teacher leads with what she has planned for the weekend and encourage children to share)
 

 

 

Language Arts

 

Letter and Number Parts

numbers

 

 

S/E  0.1..2   Express ideas for activities and initiate discussions.

Materials: Letter manipulatives, paper, a writing utensil, scissors and glue.

Beginning: Parents will tell the children they are going to look at written letters and numbers to see which ones have straight parts and which ones have curved parts, adding that some may have both. Parents may choose to use different letter manipulatives from around the house. Students will find different magazine cutouts of letters, letter stamps, felt letters, paper, markers and glue.

Middle: Parents will then encourage the child to name the letters and comment on the parts (using vocabulary words such as straight, round, circle, half-circle, lines, curves, up and down, sideways point).

End: Together count out the amount of letters, and numbers on each side of the graph (Compare curved lined letters against straight lined letters)
 

Shape and Size Bingo

 

 

Math

L.PK.1  Begin to understand the conventions of standard English grammar when speaking during interactions and activities

Beginning: Draw an image of boxes similar to the one below. Next, draw a shape in each box.

 

      △

  ◯

      △

      ◯

  □

      ◯

         □  

 

    △

 

 

Middle: Place a small snack (cheerios) on each shape. Tell your child: “Pick the cheerio on the Big Circle”.

End: You can make the activity more complex by adding more quadrants and asking your child to pick cheerios off 2 shapes. You can add the time concepts: “First, next, then, last  pick…”

 

 

Social Emotional

 

Emotion Mask

social emotional

S/E 0.3.1:  Children demonstrate and express feelings. Recognize and describe a wide range of feelings, including sadness, anger, fear, and happiness.

Beginning:  The adult will assist the child in cutting out a variety of shapes. 

Middle: Then, on a blank paper, each one will draw a large circle representing a face. Place the shapes inside the face to represent different face features. For example use a square to represent a nose, 2 triangles to represent eyes and a circle for the mouth. The adult will describe the face he made: What shapes he used for each feature. Then the child will describe his created face.

End:  Looking at the different faces your child makes, discuss the emotions they express. For example, circle eyes and circle mouth represent someone who is “surprised."

 

Gross Motor

 

Shapes Twister Game 

 

shapes

 

L.PK. 1 Begin to understand the conventions of standard English grammar when speaking during interactions and activities

H/S/PE: Develop and refine gross-motor skills (e.g., hopping, galloping, jumping, running, and marching).

Beginning: Draw 3 shapes, a circle, a square and a triangle on 3 sheets of paper and place them on the floor. On small cards or cut out paper, draw one shape on each card, as well as a hand and a foot on one card each.

Middle: Pick one shape card and 1 hand or foot card. Show them to your child then ask your child to follow 1 command, for example: Put your hand on the circle. Give him a turn to pick the 2 cards and tell you the command.

End: Ask your child to follow 2 steps commands by picking 2 cards and then 2 others. For example: Place your foot on the square and your hand on the circle.

 

Older children: You can create more complex commands by adding more shapes, in different colors.

 

Preschool Plans Day 27

10/19/20

 

Marvelous Monday
 
1. 1 eggGood Morning!
sun(Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks)
harmony-Teacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmates letter links using their fingers or props (i.e., holding up each student’s letterlink on a popsicle stick)
2. 2 eggs“Today is Song”
     
music notechart
(To the tune of “Frere Jacque”)
Today is Monday
Today is Monday
All day long, all day long!
Yesterday was Sunday
Tomorrow will be Tuesday
Oh what fun!
Oh what fun!
 
3 eggs 3. Deep Breath/Stretches
stretches
(Teacher can close with leading deep breathing and stretching exercises to prepare students for a healthy rest of the day)deep breath
 
 

Language Arts

 

Nursery Rhymes: Humpty Dumpty 

 

humpty dumpty 

W.PK.5 With guidance and support, share a drawing with dictation, scribble-writing, letter-strings, or invented spelling to describe an event, real or imagined.

Materials:  Paper and a writing utensil.   Humpty Dumpty.pdf

Beginning:  Recite Humpty Dumpty with your child.  Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall, Humpty Dumpty had a great fall, All the king’s horses and all the king’s men, Couldn’t put Humpty together again. 

Middle: Brainstorm different things we can do if someone falls down then ask your child what they would do to help Humpty Dumpty.

End:  Have your child draw a picture of what they would do to help Humpty Dumpty.  Send me a picture of it when you’re done!  (Teacher can assemble all the pictures they receive to create a class book to read to children.)

 

Younger children:  Have your child tell you a sentence to go with their picture and write it down for them.

Older children:  Have your child tell you a sentence to go with their picture.  Have them write down the sounds that they hear.
 

Math

How Many Times? 

humpty

 

M:4.1.1 Count to 20 by ones with minimal prompting.

M: 4.1.2 Recognize and name one-digit written numbers up to 10 with minimal prompting.

Materials:  Humpty Dumpty Song

Beginning: View the link to the nursery rhyme Humpty Dumpty with your child.

Middle:  Invite your child to brainstorm different ways to keep “Humpty,” the egg safe from breaking when dropped.

Count how many times the egg drops before breaking. Record each drop with a tally mark on the paper.

End: Count the tally marks and record the number.

 

Younger children: Encourage children to make tally marks and count with them. Older children:  Encourage children to write the number or identify the correct number
 

Social-Emotional

Mix It up    

color

 

 

S: 5.1.1Display curiosity about materials, activities, and longer-term investigation in progress (e.g. ask who, what, when, where, and why during focused inquiry.)

Materials: You will need skittles, water, cups, paint brushes, and paper.

Beginning: The amount of Skittles varies depending on the amount of paint you want to make. Recommendation would be to get two regular sized bags of Skittles. Both parents and child may want to observe the skittles for, comparing, grouping, counting, estimating, and color recognition.

Middle: The basic transformation from primary to secondary colors is exciting for our friends to see but it is still magical when you are making that change yourself! First start with the primary colors from the red, blue, and yellow skittles. All you need is Zip lock bags filled with water to make colored paint, to let the kids experiment, let them hold the bag and see what happens with time. Remember, the more water you add, the paler your color will be. For stronger color, add less water.

End: Once they finish mixing the colors use the zip-lock bags to show what they made. With the color they made have them paint how they feel today! Leave the closing open ended as they may feel “excited” and want to paint with all the colors. As they are painting, express to them how each color makes you feel throughout the day as an example. Now you are ready to paint with the Skittle Paint.  The paint will be like painting with watercolor paint. It is a very thin paint but slightly sticky to the touch.

 

Older children: Make a batch of ice paints for your kids and let them get super creative while keeping cool at the same time. All you  need to do this is to pour the paint that you  did not finish into ice cube trays. Freeze for about 4 to 6 hours or overnight, and then the fun can begin! These run super smoothly on the paper and the colors are great
 

Follow the Leader:

Gross Motor

follow the leader

 

H/S/PE: 2.4.1 Develop and refine gross-motor skills (e.g., hopping, galloping, jumping, running, and marching.

Materials:  Follow the Leader

Beginning: Play the video of the nursery rhyme: Follow the leader” and encourage your child to imitate the leader’s moves.

Middle: Make different faces or hand motions.  The children will imitate and “follow” the leader.

End: Have your child be the “leader” for you to follow.
 

Preschool Plans Day: 28

10/20/20

Tuesday Time
1. 1 clockGood Morning!
sun(Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks)
harmony-Teacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmates letter links using their fingers or props (i.e., holding up each student’s letterlink on a popsicle stick)
2. 2 clocksClassroom/Home Agreement reminderschecklist
 
3. 3 clocksCan you be a Superfriend?
 
(Teacher can close out by introducing the concept of “Superfriend” bookby leading a discussion of ways to be a superfriend at home. I.e., helping Mom and Dad make dinner, set the table, etc.)
 

Language Arts

Nursery Rhymes: Humpty Dumpty

humpty dumpty

 

W.PK.5 With guidance and support, share a drawing with dictation, scribble-writing, letter-strings, or invented spelling to describe an event, real or imagined.

Materials: Paper and a writing utensil.     Humpty Dumpty.pdf

Beginning:  Recite Humpty Dumpty with your child.  Humpty Dumpty sat on a wall, Humpty Dumpty had a great fall, All the king’s horses and all the king’s men, Couldn’t put Humpty together again. 

Middle: Have a discussion with your child about how Humpty Dumpty is feeling after falling off the wall.  Take a piece of paper and fold it in half to create a card.  Have your child write a Get Well Soon card for Humpty Dumpty.  Make sure they sign their name.

End:  Extend the activity by writing cards to family members.  Send me a picture of your cards when they’re done!

 

Younger Children:  Have your child dictate what they want to say in their card and write it down for them

 

 

Math

 

Hickory Dickory Dock

clock

 

M:4.1.1 Count to 20 by ones with minimal prompting.  4.1.2 Recognize and name one-digit written numbers up to 10 with minimal prompting. 4.1.3 Know that written numbers are symbols for number quantities and, with support, begin to write numbers from 0 to 10. 4.1.4 Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities (i.e., the last word stated when counting tells “how many”): (a)Accurately count quantities of objects up to 10, using one-to one-correspondence, and accurately count as many as 5 objects in a scattered configuration

Materials:     Hickory Dickory Dock | Super Simple Songs

Beginning:  View the link to the nursery rhyme Hickory, Dickory, Dock with your child.

Middle:  Recite the rhyme several times using different numbers each time. Invite your child to build a tower to represent each number with any available items.  An alternative to building would be to use household items to represent each number (for example 2 spoons, 3 forks, 4 pencils)

End:  Write the number next to each pile  to show how many

 

Older children: Invite your child to write the number representing how many for each pile.

 

 

 

Social-Emotional

 

Super Friend

super friend

S/E 0.4.2 Demonstrate socially acceptable behavior for teachers and peers (e.g., give hugs, get a tissue, sit next to a friend/teacher, hold hands).

Materials: See Links  I Can Be a Super Friend!.pdf  and  DIY No Sew Superhero Cape

Beginning: Parents will need to see attached PDF of story “I Can Be a Super Friend!” As parents begin to read they will need to pause to discuss the actions of the “Super Friend” in the story.

Middle: While reading make sure to draw attention to cue cards when appropriate and encourage children to share their own experiences as and with friends.  After the story is read, explain that children will create a “Super Friend” cape that they will use later.

End: Child will then need to look around the house with the parent for a recycled shirt they may not need anymore. With parents' help and the link provided by the teacher, students can wear a decorative cape! To extend play parents can use markers or anything a creative child may have that sticks to the shirt this is open ended. Child can wear cape throughout the day to remind themselves hoto be a “Super Friend”

Older children:  Painting with a Friend Materials Needed: One large paper on the floor. An adult is going to need to pair with a child to draw or paint together. When dry, put all the names of who  contributed the art and hang it on a wall for them to see!

S/E 0.4.2 Demonstrate socially acceptable behavior for teachers and peers (e.g., give hugs, get a tissue, sit next to a friend/teacher, hold hands).

Materials: See Links  I Can Be a Super Friend!.pdf  and  DIY No Sew Superhero Cape

Beginning: Parents will need to see attached PDF of story “I Can Be a Super Friend!” As parents begin to read they will need to pause to discuss the actions of the “Super Friend” in the story.

Middle: While reading make sure to draw attention to cue cards when appropriate and encourage children to share their own experiences as and with friends.  After the story is read, explain that children will create a “Super Friend” cape that they will use later.

End: Child will then need to look around the house with the parent for a recycled shirt they may not need anymore. With parents' help and the link provided by the teacher, students can wear a decorative cape! To extend play parents can use markers or anything a creative child may have that sticks to the shirt this is open ended. Child can wear cape throughout the day to remind themselves hoto be a “Super Friend”

Older children:  Painting with a Friend Materials Needed: One large paper on the floor. An adult is going to need to pair with a child to draw or paint together. When dry, put all the names of who  contributed the art and hang it on a wall for them to see!

 

 

Gross Motor

Hickory, Dickory, Dock  

clock

 

H/S/PE: 2.4.1 Develop and refine gross-motor skills (e.g., hopping, galloping, jumping, running, and marching.

Beginning:Using chalk, draw numbers 1-12, like a clock, on the ground or write the numbers on paper and tape to the floor.

Middle: Call out a number and have your child identify it.  Once standing on the number do that many movements (hops, twists, kicks, etc.).

End: Continue playing until all 12 numbers are identified. 

Younger children: Call out the number and walk with your child to that number.  Count the number of movements your child does as they are in motion.

 

 

Preschool Plans: Day 29 

10/21/20

Wednesday Wonders

 

1. sticks and stonesGood Morning!

sun(Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks)

2. spidersClassroom/Home Agreement reminderschecklist

 

3. 3 spidersSticks and Stones Nursery Rhyme: Sticks and Stones music

Play the sticks and stones song then discuss the importance of the words : “Thanks”, “Please”, “Hello/Hi”.

Introduce the Scribble Stone social-emotional activity.      

 

 

Language Arts

Nursery Rhymes: Humpty Dumpty

 humpty

 

RI.PK.2 With prompting and support, recall important facts from a familiar text.

Materials: Paper, a writing utensil and glue/tape.  Humpty Flannel Board

Beginning:  Recite Humpty Dumpty with your child.  Draw and cut out a picture of Humpty Dumpty, a wall, the king, 2 horses, 2 of the king’s men and a broken Humpty Dumpty or print out the provided PDF

Middle: Have your child use the pictures to put the nursery rhyme in the correct sequence.

End: After placing all the pictures in the correct sequence, have your child tape or glue the pictures onto a piece of paper and retell the nursery rhyme to you.

Younger children:  Assist your child with placing the pictures in the correct sequence if necessary.

 

 

 

Math

Little Miss Muffet 

little miss muffit

 

 

M: 4.1.1 Count to 20 by ones with minimal prompting.

M:  4.1.2 Recognize and name one-digit written numbers up to 10 with minimal prompting.

Little Miss Muffet | Nursery rhyme for kids

Beginning: :  View the video link with your child to familiarize yourself with the nursery rhyme.

Middle: Ask your child how fast they think  Miss Muffet ran away. Go outside and invite your child to run from one object to another. Time how long it takes.

End: Repeat several times and show the numbers on the timer to your child. Ask them to tell you what number they see.  Discuss the differences

Older children:  Have your child tell you the number on the timer. 

 

 

Social-Emotional

Scribble Stone Part 1:

 

 

S/E 0.3.1 Children demonstrate and express feelings. Recognize and describe a wide range of feelings, including sadness, anger, fear, and happiness.

Materials:  Scribble Stones

Beginning:  Watch the read aloud youtube video : “Scribble Stone”

Middle: Discuss Scribble Stone’s feelings throughout the book.

End: Talk about what each family member does to bring happiness to others.

 

 

 

Gross Motor

Crawling in a Spider Web

spider

 

M: 4.4.1 Respond to and use positional words (e.g., in, under, between, down, behind)

H/S/PE: 2.4.1 Develop and refine gross-motor skills (e.g., hopping, galloping, jumping, running, and marching).

Beginning:

Using string,  toilet paper, streamers, or anything similar around the house, create a “web.” Criss cross that web materials high and low. This can be done in a hallway, corner of a room, or any available space.

 

crawl      crawl     crawl

Middle: Invite your child to crawl, climb, and wiggle through the web.  Try giving them directions such as go under, now step over, move your leg on top.

End: When your child reaches the end, why not try going back through the web?

 

 

  Preschool Plans: Day 30

 10/22/20

Thoughtful Thursday
 
1. duckGood Morning!
sun (Greeting with Good Morning Song of Teacher’s usual choice along with Letterlinks)
harmony-Teacher can lead the students in counting and identifying each of their classmates letter links using their fingers or props (i.e., holding up each student’s letterlink on a popsicle stick)
2. 2 ducks Classroom/Home Agreement remindersreminder
 
3. 3 ducksStatues: As the virtual learning meeting begins, the teacher will introduce the word “statue.” The conversation may go like this: “Have you ever seen a statue?” She will show pictures of a variety of statues..
 
Then, the teacher will lead children through the gross motor activity of the day
Frozen Statues through a video. statue of liberty
 
 

Language Arts

 

Nursery Rhymes: Humpty Dumpty

 humpty

RF.PK.2.a Recognize and produce simple rhyming words.

Materials:  Paper and a writing utensil.  Humpty Flannel Board

Beginning:  Recite Humpty Dumpty with your child.  Draw and cut out a picture of Humpty Dumpty, a wall, the king, 2 horses, 2 of the king’s men and a broken Humpty Dumpty or print out  the provided PDF

Middle:  Bring your child’s attention to how the words wall and fall rhyme.  Brainstorm more words that rhyme with fall like: all, call, tall, ball, hall & mall. 

End:  Have your child draw pictures of the rhyming words.  Send me a picture of what you drew!

Younger children:  Have them tell you what each picture is and write down their words.

Older children:  Have child label pictures with the initial sound if possible or brainstorm and draw a different group of rhyming words.

 

Math

Five Little Ducks

numbers

 

M: 4.1.4. Understand the relationship between numbers and quantities.

Materials:   Five Little Ducks

Beginning: Watch the music video “Five Little ducks” one time:

Middle: Watch the video again with your child. Every time the ducks come back, while pointing  with your child to the ducks on the screen, count along the ducks that came back.

End:  Help your child draw 5 ducks then cut them out. USing 1 to 1 correspondence, assist your child in counting 1 to 5 ducks.

Older Children: Act out the song by removing 1 duck while singing along to the song to familiarize your child with the subtraction concept.
 

Social-Emotional

Scribble Stone Part 2:

scribble stone

 

V/PA 1.4.2 Children express themselves through and develop an appreciation of the visual arts. Create two- and three- dimensional works of art while exploring line, color, shape, form, texture, and space.

Beginning: Take a walk in the park and pick a stone. If this is not possible, look through items at home that you can draw on and pass along to others to use.

Middle: Assist your child in decorating the item. You can color or paste items such as bows, feathers, pompons, or threads…

End: Ask your child to give the decorated item to someone to make them happy
 

Gross Motor

Frozen Statues

frozen

 

V/PA: 1.1.1 Move the body in a variety of ways, with and without music

Materials:   Statue

Beginning:   Play the youtube video “Statue Song”. Invite your child  to play a “Frozen statue” game.

Middle:  Explain that they will move while the music plays. When the music stops, freeze like a statue.

End: Vary the song choices using both fast and slow tempo

Older children:  Extend the game by showing your child movement cards.  Invite them to copy.

body